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FCC announces Children’s Agenda for broadband

Four-pronged plan focuses on digital access, literacy, citizenship, and safety

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski highlighted ways the new National Broadband Plan will effect children and families.

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski highlighted ways the new National Broadband Plan will affect children and families.

Digital access, literacy, citizenship, and safety are the four key areas of focus in the Federal Communications Commission’s plan to bring broadband access to all children.

Broadband internet access should be available to 100 percent of American children, but parents should be aware of the possible challenges they will face by the increased amount of time their children might spend online, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said in a March 12 speech.

Genachowski announced the creation of the FCC’s “Children’s Agenda for Digital Opportunity,” which he said will build on the four pillars of digital access, digital literacy, digital citizenship, and digital safety. The Children’s Agenda is part of the National Broadband Plan to be released this week.

Genachowski explained that the FCC followed a series of core principles when developing initiatives around kids, media, and technology.

“Children are our most precious national resource. We must do everything we can to educate and prepare them to thrive in the 21st century, and keep them safe,” he said. “Empowering parents is an essential strategy in this area.”

He added that the government has an appropriate role to play, though it might be a limited one, while honoring the First Amendment. And, the FCC needs to ensure that all children have access to broadband.

“Unfortunately, more than 13 million school-age children don’t have broadband at home, and many have only limited access to broadband connections at school. That means 25 percent of U.S. children—one out every four kids—are missing out on the opportunities of broadband,” he said. “We need to ensure that all of our nation’s children have access to broadband. Anything less than 100 percent is not good enough.”

To achieve these goals, the National Broadband Plan, set to be unveiled March 17, will propose steps to ensure that every child in America benefits from digital opportunities.

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Comment:

  1. fedup52

    March 17, 2010 at 3:30 pm

    I am a parent, I have spend an immense amount of time educating myself about the process of education. Internet access is not the problem for our failing students. The refusal to validate before promoting a student that they have the core concepts in place is the reasons the students fail. I have heard it across the spectrum “it is the student’s responsibility to succeed”. When they, the teachers, have a schedule and they do, they don’t go back even when 50% of the students didn’t grasp the lesson. Principals and teachers at the middle school level grousing that the students come from elementary still not knowing the multiplication tables. You don’t need to know them, just do that grid thing and you will get the correct answer. It just takes time and when your testing the students, it is timed; unanswered questions count against the student. A sudy shows that less than 11% of students know how to effectively search on the internet. This means if you can’t find the data, it can’t help you. This is another ruse for the White House to further control the internet. What emergency will it take for the President to decide to prevent access (which is in a bill coming before the Senate) maybe you saying you dislike him and his policies?
    Education deserves to have politics leave it alone.

  2. fedup52

    March 17, 2010 at 3:30 pm

    I am a parent, I have spend an immense amount of time educating myself about the process of education. Internet access is not the problem for our failing students. The refusal to validate before promoting a student that they have the core concepts in place is the reasons the students fail. I have heard it across the spectrum “it is the student’s responsibility to succeed”. When they, the teachers, have a schedule and they do, they don’t go back even when 50% of the students didn’t grasp the lesson. Principals and teachers at the middle school level grousing that the students come from elementary still not knowing the multiplication tables. You don’t need to know them, just do that grid thing and you will get the correct answer. It just takes time and when your testing the students, it is timed; unanswered questions count against the student. A sudy shows that less than 11% of students know how to effectively search on the internet. This means if you can’t find the data, it can’t help you. This is another ruse for the White House to further control the internet. What emergency will it take for the President to decide to prevent access (which is in a bill coming before the Senate) maybe you saying you dislike him and his policies?
    Education deserves to have politics leave it alone.