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Ten grant-writing resolutions for the new year

Ten grant-writing resolutions for the new year

Follow these 10 resolutions for 2011, and you'll find more grant-writing success.

As one year ends and another begins, I always think it’s a good idea to go back and review the basics of grant writing and develop some resolutions around them.

Through the course of the year, as deadlines pile up and grant writing reaches a fever pitch at times, don’t forget to sit back, relax, and remember these resolutions—and you’ll be sure to find more grant-writing success. (I promise, none of them have anything to do with losing weight or exercising!)

1. Resolve to read at least one book about grant writing this year.

I have to admit that I don’t make it a habit of doing this (usually owing to a lack of time), but I bought a book at the end of last year and started to read it … and I realized there was some helpful information for me, so I’m going to finish reading it this year.

There are several books available that deal with grant writing, so have fun choosing one! A few I’d recommend: Storytelling for Grantseekers by Cheryl A. Clarke; Grantseeker’s Toolkit and Grantseeker’s Budget Toolkit by Cheryl Carter New and James Aaron Quick; and my own books, Writing Grant Proposals that Win, Third Edition and Effective Grants Management.

More grant-seeking advice from Deborah Ward:

Where to find grants for education

How to find private sources of funding

Advance planning is the single biggest key to grant-seeking success

A strong budget narrative can help sell your proposal

Death of a grant proposal: Six lessons learned in post-mortem

2. Resolve to attend one conference or webinar about grant writing this year.

This one I actually did carry out last year by attending some webinars, but there were a couple of conferences that I missed, so I’m going to plan to attend one this year.

3. Resolve to plan ahead.

Those of you who regularly read my columns won’t surprised to see this resolution. I find that the one way to minimize stress in this field is to plan ahead as much as possible for the grants I’ll have to write in the next 12 months. I prefer to keep those last-minute “surprise” proposals to a minimum!

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