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New report details children’s media consumption

Exposure to multiple digital tools at young ages is increasing

"Always Connected" states that children are using media more than ever before on a variety of platforms.

While children’s use of mobile media devices and computers is on the rise, they still use television as their primary media source, according to a report released March 14 by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center.

The report, entitled “Always Connected: The new digital media habits of young children,” examined media usage patterns in young children.

Almost nine out of 10 children over the age of five watch television at least three hours a day.

“Even as technology evolves and young children increasingly turn to games and mobile media, they still love television best,” the report said.

The center also found that media consumption patterns alter considerably around age eight, when children are developmentally able to participate in activities for longer and have more advanced motor skills.

Family income still acts as a barrier for owning media devices, with lower-income Hispanic and African American children consuming far larger amounts of media than their middle-class and white counterparts.

“While virtually every household in America owns a television, regardless of income or ethnicity, black and Hispanic children watch more TV than their white counterparts,” the study said.

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Comment:

  1. lehenderpa027

    March 18, 2011 at 11:06 am

    I don’t understand what the writer is getting at here: “Family income still acts as a barrier for owning media devices, with lower-income Hispanic and African American children consuming far larger amounts of media than their middle-class and white counterparts.” If lower-income children consume more media, where is the barrier?

  2. lehenderpa027

    March 18, 2011 at 11:06 am

    I don’t understand what the writer is getting at here: “Family income still acts as a barrier for owning media devices, with lower-income Hispanic and African American children consuming far larger amounts of media than their middle-class and white counterparts.” If lower-income children consume more media, where is the barrier?