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West Virginia asks counties to plan for electronic textbooks

State taking a two-year hiatus on buying social studies textbooks as it prepares for a shift to digital resources

Danny Protzman, parent of South Middle School student Paige Protzman, 12, said making a push toward educational technology is a good idea, but keeping traditional textbooks is important.

“Computers and the internet aren’t always reliable,” he said. “[Students] need to have the books too, because you never know.”

Paige, who would be affected more directly by electronic textbooks, said simply, “I like books better.”

Kathy Grimes, of Morgantown, W.Va., who home schools her three children, said there is a place for both new technology and traditional teaching materials.

More news about digital textbooks:

All Korean textbooks to go digital by 2015

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Virginia using iPads to teach social studies

“The power can go out, the internet can go down, and in that case, you could just open a book up,” she said. “But what happens if you don’t have textbooks anymore?”

Removing traditional textbooks all together is not the state’s plan at this point.

“In no way have we said ‘stop using traditional textbooks.’ They will still be there,” Cordeiro said.

With careful planning and effective execution, the program could bring great opportunities to Monongalia County students, Devono said.

Copyright (c) 2011, The Dominion Post, Morgantown, W.Va., and eSchool Media. eSchool News editors contributed to this report. To see more of The Dominion Post or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.dominionpost.com/. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

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Comment:

  1. buzzygwood

    July 14, 2011 at 10:47 am

    This move to digital textbooks will take time, but in the end, makes total sense. I don’t think a laptop is the right form factor — maybe something like a tablet device such as an iPad seems appropriate. As for equity, schools need to build infrastructures that can support a variety of devices on their networks and encourage students to bring their own technology to ease the burden on schools from the unrealistic responsibility of providing every student a device.

  2. buzzygwood

    July 14, 2011 at 10:47 am

    This move to digital textbooks will take time, but in the end, makes total sense. I don’t think a laptop is the right form factor — maybe something like a tablet device such as an iPad seems appropriate. As for equity, schools need to build infrastructures that can support a variety of devices on their networks and encourage students to bring their own technology to ease the burden on schools from the unrealistic responsibility of providing every student a device.