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3 startling misconceptions about student testing

By Meris Stansbury, Associate Editor, @eSN_Meris
February 7th, 2014

New report reveals the problem isn’t time on testing; it’s the quality of the tests

testing-student-misconceptions A new report is shedding light on what the nation might not know but teachers have known for a while: Time spent on testing depends on district requirements and the quality of the tests. The report argues that it’s time to switch the national conversation from time-spent-on-testing to quality of testing.

The report, “The Student & the Stopwatch: How much time do American students spend on testing?” produced by Teach Plus and authored by Mark Teoh, Ed.D., director of Research& Knowledge at Teach Plus and a former teacher and administrator, encompasses research from 32 districts across the U.S.—both urban and suburban—and over 300 teachers.

The report measured testing habits in both English Language Arts (ELA) and math in kindergarten, third and seventh grades.

What researchers found was that there are three enormous misconceptions when it comes to students testing, with implications for district policy, test design and the implementation of Common Core testing.

“The report clearly demonstrated that the current polarized testing debate is not rooted in the reality our students face across the country,” said Dr. Celine Coggins, CEO of Teach Plus. “The amount of time students spend taking tests is considerably lower than most people would estimate. It is time to shift the national conversation on testing from the amount of test time to the quality of tests and ensuring that teachers have the information they need to help their students succeed.”

(Next page: 3 misconceptions)

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One Response to “3 startling misconceptions about student testing”

theatrebob
February 10, 2014

The amount of time spent “testing” is a worthless metric. This is more smoke and mirrors from testing companies. The real killer of classroom time is the time teachers are forced to spend teaching to the tests. It is positive to hear that quality of testing is important, but this still does not address the overall detriment testing does to the classroom learning process.