News

LeapFrog’s $140 tablet includes some adaptive learning features

By Stephen Noonoo
August 21st, 2015

New tablet adjusts learning to young learners’ needs

leapfrog-tabletLeapFrog has released a new Android-based tablet for young learners designed to scale learning activities as students grow, meaning it is capable of remembering curricular progress across games, automatically adjusting learning levels, and providing tutorials on demand for students when they struggle.
The tablet, called Epic, is meant for students from pre-K to about nine years old. It uses a special browser only allowing access to pre-selected, kid-safe web content. According to the company, this includes more than 5,000 videos, images, websites and games “reviewed and approved by LeapFrog learning experts.” Adults can unlock an unrestricted browser for kids when they want, and can also adjust the amount of time their child spends on the tablet by total time, hours of the day, and by app category for up to three different kids.
Retailing at $140, the tablet features a quad-core processor, seven-inch multi-touch capacitive LCD screen, front and back camera, video recorder, 16 GB of memory, and about six hours of battery life. It includes a removable “kid-safe” bumper and tethered stylus.
“The LeapFrog Epic tablet is age-appropriate right out of the box, but grows with a child. Children expect technology that’s more like their parents’ – sleeker and faster, whereas parents want technology that has been designed with kids in mind and safely delivers educational and development benefits, not just another TV screen,” said John Barbour, LeapFrog CEO.
Like most other tablets, it is being offered commercially at popular retail outlets.
Material from a press release was used in this report.

 

About the Author:

Stephen Noonoo

Stephen Noonoo is a former editor of eSchool News. He has served as a consultant for CUE, California’s ISTE affiliate, and as managing editor of its quarterly publication, OnCUE. He has worked as a freelance writer, an education editor for SmartBrief newsletters, and as a staff editor for a well-known publication focusing on education technology.