Expanding technology’s influence

By Laura Devaney, Director of News, @eSN_Laura
May 20th, 2016

STEM news

Catch up on the most compelling K-12 news stories you may have missed this week

Every Friday, I’ll recap some of the most interesting and thought-provoking news developments that occurred over the week.

I can’t fit all of this week’s news stories here, though, so feel free to visit and read up on other news you may have missed.

This week, we’re focusing on some expanded technology and engineering developments. For instance, Plus, when it comes to technology and engineering skills, girls are outpacing boys. Technology also can be key in delivering social and emotional education. And a new study found that the resource gap–including technology funding and access–is critical to closing the achievement gap.

Read on for more:

Girls outpace boys in tech and engineering problem solving
White and black female students outperformed their male peers in technology and engineering literacy, according to the first-ever nationally representative assessment of technology and engineering literacy from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). But gaps remain as less than half scored at either the proficient or advanced level.

Resource gap may be key to closing achievement gap
Ensuring equal access to resources can help improve educational outcomes and close achievement gaps for children from low-income families, according to a new study. The study from the Educational Testing Service (ETS) notes that improving state finance systems can go a long way to support equitable funding and increased resource access.

You are a global educator. It’s time to start thinking like one
It’s one thing for today’s students to connect with the world and to appreciate the diversity and significance of potential interactions through everyday, real-time interaction. It is a whole different challenge to be able to collaborate with learning partners across town — or around the world.

3 ways to use tech in social and emotional learning
As students prepare for the jobs of tomorrow, social and emotional learning, supported by technology, can help build in-demand skills.

About the Author:

Laura Devaney

Laura Devaney is the Director of News for eSchool Media. She is a graduate of the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill College of Journalism. When she isn't wrangling her two children, Laura enjoys running, photography, home improvement, and rooting for the Terps. Find Laura on Twitter: @eSN_Laura