News

New trends for new teaching strategies

By Laura Devaney, Director of News, @eSN_Laura
July 29th, 2016

Catch up on the most compelling K-12 news stories you may have missed this week

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Every Friday, I’ll recap some of the most interesting and thought-provoking news developments that occurred over the week.

I can’t fit all of this week’s news stories here, though, so feel free to visit eSchoolNews.com and read up on other news you may have missed.

As education evolves, so do trends and strategies to deliver instruction in the best possible way. When educators are aware of ways to improve instruction, students benefit and can show increased achievement. This week, we’ve gathered some of those trends in one place for you, from a new approach to science intruction to turning virtual teachers into online learning experts.

Read on for more:

Are high schools teaching science backward?
U.S. high schools are teaching science in a backward sequence of courses that is a remnant of 19th century thinking, says former Harman executive and New Jersey Teacher of the Year Robert Goodman—and changing the order in which science courses are taken and the way they’re delivered can lead to profound differences in both STEM interest and achievement.
Cyber security course for teachers includes lessons on hacking
As the use of digital technology in education and among students for private use has grown over the years, so too has the threat from hackers, identity thieves and cyber bullies. Daniel Sigler, an 11th and 12th grade social studies teacher at Gadsden City High, said his school’s recent purchase of new computers for all its students opens the possibility of online threats.
Teachers say virtual reality would boost engagement
A large majority of K-12 teachers said they would like to integrate virtual reality in their classrooms, but just 2 percent of teachers have actually done so, according to a survey.
How this state is turning its virtual teachers into online learning experts
In Arkansas, as in most states, student interest in online learning is skyrocketing. While most students still take at least some of their courses in a face-to-face setting, the need to scale online learning opportunities for thousands of students has required new infrastructure, new curriculum, and, of course, new teachers.

About the Author:

Laura Devaney

Laura Ascione Devaney is the Managing Editor, Content Services at eSchool Media. She is a graduate of the University of Maryland's prestigious Philip Merrill College of Journalism. When she isn't wrangling her two children, Laura enjoys running, photography, home improvement, and rooting for the Terps. Find Laura on Twitter: @eSN_Laura http://twitter.com/eSN_Laura