19 new districts join League of Innovative Schools

By Stephen Noonoo
October 4th, 2016

Digital Promise League of Innovative Schools inducts innovative districts working toward change


A cohort of 19 new school districts have been accepted into the League of Innovative Schools, a national coalition of forward-thinking school districts organized by Digital Promise, an independent, bipartisan nonprofit organization authorized by Congress to accelerate innovation in education.

The League of Innovative Schools, launched in late 2011, accepts new members through an open application process once per year. Twenty-two districts were accepted last year. With the new members, the League now has a presence in 33 states, representing 3.3 million students. The full list of members can be found at

In addition to the 19 new members, several former members — Blue Valley USD 229, Bristol Township School District, Fulton County Schools, and Lexington County School District One — were re-admitted under new superintendents.

“From Rhode Island to Missouri to Arizona, and many places in between, this year’s League cohort provides high-quality, authentic learning opportunities to students,” reads a new blog post on the League’s website announcing the inductions. “For example, students with sensory impairments participate in maker learning camps offered by the Utah Schools for the Blind and the Deaf; students in Compton Unified School District (CA) are learning computer science from pre-K to senior year; and the School District of Lee County (KY) is committed to providing pathways to college for its students in rural Kentucky through robust local and national partnerships.”

The League is also kickstarting a new podcast series featuring current members, like Steve Webb, superintendent of Vancouver Public Schools in Washington (pictured).

New cohort additions include:

About the Author:

Stephen Noonoo

Stephen Noonoo is the current editor of eSchool News. He is a former consultant for CUE, California’s ISTE affiliate, and managing editor of its quarterly publication, OnCUE. He has worked as a freelance writer, an education editor for SmartBrief newsletters, and as a staff editor for a well-known publication focusing on education technology.

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