Technology & Learning, September 1998, p. 61

Technology can help teachers both free up their time and respond to a growing demand for accountability and assessment reports. Here are five tools that work:

  1. Electronic grade books. These user-friendly software packages are designed to look like traditional grade books and allow teachers to quickly track student performance, generate sophisticated reports, and easily transfer data to district-level computers.

  2. “Open architecture” administration software. Grades, attendance records, schedules, and other student information can flow freely among teachers, school officials, and district personnel.

  3. Curriculum planning tools. Using networks that connect teachers and schools across great distances, these computer programs let teachers share with each other lesson plans and educational resources, such as multimedia software packages, laser discs, and web sites.

  4. Security utilities. These tiny programs keep students and other unauthorized people from viewing personal and confidential material that may reside on an educator’s desktop computer.

  5. Intranets. These link together schools and districts so that large numbers of users can share central resources, such as frequently used forms, paperwork, and even computer software.