Technology & Learning, June 1999, p. 33

The author identifies three technology-based contests for students and three recognition programs for tech-savvy teachers, providing examples of successful past entries to help you get on the winning side.

First, the technology-based student contests:

1. CyberFair. Sponsored by Global Schoolhouse, this contest spurs partnerships between schools and their communities, and uses the internet to share resources. Open to students ages 5-18, the team-based contest encourages students to learn about their communities and to share that information on the team’s web page. The international contest recognizes five projects from around the world with a variety of prizes. (http://www.gsn.org/cf)

2. Multimedia Mania. Run by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), this competition encourages the incorporation of multimedia elements in content-based projects. Working in small teams, students develop projects that correlate with what they are studying in the classroom. HyperSig recognizes one project as the winner plus two runners-up in each of three age groups. Winners receive multimedia authoring software and a trip to the National Education Computing Conference. (http://www.ncsu.edu/ midlink/mmania.how.html)

3. ThinkQuest. Sponsored by Advanced Network & Services, this contest involves international collaborations and the building of web sites to share information. There are two competitions: one for ages 12-19, and ThinkQuest Jr. for grades 4-6. A “Best of Contest” is recognized in each age group, with others selected as winners in five other categories. (http://www.think quest.org)

Here are the teacher recognition programs:

1. Teaching With Computer Technology. This Compaq Computer program recognizes innovative uses of computers and the internet in the classroom. Compaq selects two winners from each state, with winners each getting a classroom computer. (http://www.compaq.com/education/K12/success)

2. ISTE’s Online Learning Contest. ISTE’s teacher competition focuses on the innovative use of telecommunications networks in the curriculum. Ten to 15 teachers are typically selected as winners, though the focus is more on recognition than prizes. (http://www.iste.org)

3. Technology & Learning’s Teacher of the Year Program. This program honors one teacher from every state, plus regional and national winners. Regional and national winners get a trip to a national conference to receive their award. All winners receive software, and national and regional winners get Compaq computers. (http://www.techlearning.com)