**NEW THIS MONTH**

NSF Special Categories for Full Proposals

NSF has developed a series of programs that support efforts to improve students’ understanding of science, mathematics, and technology. Most of these programs have well-defined aims and deadlines, but NSF also makes a provision for small grants that do not fit neatly into its program categories. One set of grants is aimed at helping assemble teams of experts to speak at conferences, seminars, and symposia. Other grants, called “Planning Grants,” are sought by groups that need more funding to complete a project. With these grants, NSF particularly supports new groups or large consortia that are serving groups underrepresented in science, mathematics, and technology. Another category is “Small Grants for Exploratory Research,” which NSF describes as delving into traditional areas with new approaches, researching new areas, or working on problems requiring urgent attention. NSF encourages prior contact with an officer of the Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education division before submitting a request.

Contact: Call NSF at (703) 306-1234 and ask for the Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education division

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2000/nsf0099/ nsf0099.txt

**NEW THIS MONTH**

TechConnect Grants

These grants from the Electronic Industries Foundation, which will be made next spring, encourage creative teaching through technology-based math and science projects for fifth- through eighth-graders. Awards of $2,500 to $5,000 will be made. While project proposals must be submitted by schools or teachers, they also require a corporate partner that will provide a level of real-world applicability to the program. Projects should demonstrate to students the real-world impact of math and science, and they require at least two critical skills (e.g., critical thinking, problem-solving, teamwork). Because the grants target underserved communities, demographic evidence supporting that claim must be provided. Funds must be used specifically to support the proposed classroom project and may include computers, graphing calculators, or software. Teacher training or technical support also can be funded, and requests for field trips, classroom supplies, or instructional kits are eligible, too.

Contact: Marcie Vorac at (703) 907-7408 or marciev@eif.org

http://www.eia.org/eif/techconnect.htm

Toshiba America Foundation Grants

The Toshiba America Foundation awards grants for programs and activities that improve the classroom teaching and learning of science, mathematics, and technology for middle and high school students. Public and private schools, local educational agencies, and youth organizations across the United States may apply. Projects should provide direct benefits to students and should include teacher-led, classroom-based experiences. The Small Grants Program awards up to $5,000 monthly throughout the year. The Large Grants Program awards more than $5,000 in March and September (with deadlines of Feb. 1 and Aug. 1, respectively). The annual grants budget is approximately $550,000.

Contact: (212) 588-0820 or foundation@tai.toshiba.com

http://www.toshiba.com/about/taf.html