Shielding kids from pornography online could get a little easier, if a new proposal before the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is accepted.

Ten organizations have submitted applications to sponsor new internet domains, including “.mobi” for mobile services and “.xxx” for adult content, the group that oversees key aspects of the global network announced March 19.

Each organization paid $45,000 to apply for suffixes that are to be set aside for specific industries and interest groups. The deadline for applications was March 16.

The new domains could be approved as early as this year and would be the first major additions since 2000.

The applications are scheduled to be reviewed by an independent panel this month. If approved, ICANN will negotiate specific terms and conditions with each domain registry operator.

Unlike today’s most common domains, such as “.com,” internet addresses based on the new suffixes would be available to people, organizations, or businesses that comply with rules set by the sponsoring groups.

For instance, internet addresses ending in “.mobi” would allow sites built for the small screens of mobile phones. Microsoft Corp., Nokia, Vodafone, Samsung Electronics Co., Sun Microsystems Inc., and Hewlett-Packard Co. made up the group that submitted the application for the “.mobi” domain.

The “.xxx” domain is sponsored by the International Foundation for Online Responsibility. According to the group’s web site, it would encourage the adoption of the suffix among the “responsible online adult-entertainment community.”

In theory, this would allow internet filtering software to block pornographic web sites more easily, because the software could be set to block all sites with the “.xxx” suffix. But skeptics of the idea point out that not all purveyors of pornography are responsible enough to apply for the special domain.

The other applications are “.asia,” “.cat,” “.jobs,” “.mail,” “.post,” “.tel,” and “.travel.”

In 2000, seven new top-level domains were added, including “.biz,” “.info,” “.name,” and “.pro,” which were unsponsored, and “.aero,” “.coop,” and “.museum,” which had sponsors.