In this warm season of thawed lakes, green mountains, and plentiful daylight, a small group of students will spend a month in quiet, air-conditioned classrooms in the city. They chose a different kind of summer fun: making video games at New York University’s Camp/Game: Intensive Video Game Creation.

Not that they’ll be zombied out in front of computer consoles. The campers, all guys ages 15 to 20, will use the Center for Advanced Digital Applications’ cutting-edge facilities to learn the techniques behind best-selling digital masterpieces such as “Doom,” “Quake,” and “Madden N.F.L. Football.”

Camps for musicians, artists, and athletes are widespread, but young video-game makers often must embark on a “Myst”-like quest for a mentor.

“It’s difficult for kids to get experience in this field. I usually tell the ones who call me to get in touch with companies themselves and ask for internships,” said Hal Halpin, president of The Interactive Entertainment Merchants Association, which runs gamejobs.com.

Rob Manuel, center, a dean at NYU’s Center for Advanced Digital Applications, and Nicole Tecco, right, director of NYU’s summer camp for aspiring game creators, help a student with an animation project. (Associated Press photo)

Campers arrive each day for a 9 a.m. warm-up of playing time-tested traditional games like chess or cards, followed by a discussion of the elements that explain the games’ persistent popular appeal. Lights-out could happen more than 14 hours later, if they choose to work in the computer lab from 9 to 11 p.m.

Four gaming professionals serve as instructors, and some of the advanced students in the Center’s master’s program evaluate campers’ work each day during assisted open-lab sessions. During evenings and weekends, guest lecturers from an array of video-game companies speak to campers in person or through conference calls.

Game Audio Network Guild President Tommy Tallarico is flying in from the West Coast to talk to students. He’s written music for video games, including “Terminator,” “Aladdin,” “Tomorrow Never Dies,” and “Spider-Man.”

Campers can focus on one of the three main categories of game-making: design, art, or programming. They attend classes with people in their field of interest and brainstorm in teams to hatch a game concept and playable level. At the end of the session, each team will pitch its idea to an industry panel, which will award prizes to the best game concepts.

The programmers of the bunch must have at least a rudimentary knowledge of the programming languages C or Java and experience with Adobe Systems’ Photoshop or Illustrator. There’s no prerequisite for those interested in game design.

Nicole Tecco, director of Entertainment, Technology, Digital Arts, and Design at NYU’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies, described the campers as “extremely motivated.”

“These guys are like superstars,” she said.

Inquiries about video game-making courses from high school students prompted Tecco to lay the plans for Camp/Game because the school offered only graduate and night classes. The program, which runs from July 6 to Aug. 6, is designed for high schoolers and college undergraduates.

In this warm season of thawed lakes, green mountains, and plentiful daylight, a small group of students will spend a month in quiet, air-conditioned classrooms in the city. They’re choosing a different kind of summer fun: making video games at New York University’s Camp/Game: Intensive Video Game Creation.

Not that they’ll be zombied out in front of computer consoles. The campers, all guys ages 15 to 20, will use the Center for Advanced Digital Applications’ cutting-edge facilities to learn the techniques behind best-selling digital masterpieces such as “Doom,” “Quake,” and “Madden N.F.L. Football.”

Camps for musicians, artists, and athletes are widespread, but young video-game makers often must embark on a “Myst”-like quest for a mentor.

“It’s difficult for kids to get experience in this field. I usually tell the ones who call me to get in touch with companies themselves and ask for internships,” said Hal Halpin, president of The Interactive Entertainment Merchants Association, which runs gamejobs.com.

Campers arrive each day for a 9 a.m. warm-up of playing time-tested traditional games like chess or cards, followed by a discussion of the elements that explain the games’ persistent popular appeal. Lights-out could happen more than 14 hours later, if they choose to work in the computer lab from 9 to 11 p.m.

Four gaming professionals serve as instructors, and some of the advanced students in the Center’s master’s program evaluate campers’ work each day during assisted open-lab sessions. During evenings and weekends, guest lecturers from an array of video-game companies speak to campers in person or through conference calls.

Game Audio Network Guild President Tommy Tallarico is flying in from the West Coast to talk to students. He’s written music for video games including “Terminator,” “Aladdin,” “Tomorrow Never Dies,” and “Spider-Man.”

Campers can focus on one of the three main categories of game-making: design, art, or programming. They attend classes with people in their field of interest and brainstorm in teams to hatch a game concept and playable level. At the end of the session, each team will pitch its idea to an industry panel, which will award prizes to the best game concepts.

The programmers of the bunch must have at least a rudimentary knowledge of the programming languages C or Java and experience with Adobe Systems’ Photoshop or Illustrator. There’s no prerequisite for those interested in game design.

Nicole Tecco, director of Entertainment, Technology, Digital Arts, and Design at NYU’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies, described the campers as “extremely motivated.”

“These guys are like superstars,” she said.

Inquiries about video game-making courses from high school students prompted Tecco to lay the plans for Camp/Game because the school offered only graduate and night classes. The program, which runs from July 6 to Aug. 6, is designed for high schoolers and college undergraduates.