Simplice Njoya, a University of Memphis basketball forward, sat hunched over a laptop, testing an idea first studied on Israeli fighter pilots. The premise: Skills he picks up playing a complex computer game can make him a better ball player.

"The theory is," said Memphis assistant coach Ed Schilling, referring to the computer game, "it's going to be the weight room for the brain."

The on-screen action looks nothing like a basketball game, but is designed to work on the visual and decision-making skills a player needs. Basketball programs at

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