News

2005 Student Video Discovery Awards

By eSchool News
June 1st, 2005

Parkland High School
Allentown, Pa.
“Parkland Morning News”

About the video …

Narrated by Erik Archibald and Doug Waters and shot by Charles Horne, “Parkland Morning News” takes a behind-the-scenes look at how PMN is produced. Images of students in editorial meetings, anchoring the newscast, and operating the cameras are interspersed with clips from the broadcast itself and close-ups of Archibald and Waters as they describe the production process–and reveal what students who take part in the program learn from their experience.

Said one of the SVDA judges about the video: “This is of near-professional quality, from the script to the editing: the fades, cuts, and even titles give it the look of something you might see on a network news program. A well-paced, well-sequenced, aptly shot, and expertly narrated look at an outstanding school technology initiative.”

Watch it at: http://www.eschoolnews.com/vrc/ParklandMorningNews.cfm

Erik Archibald
Archibald, a senior at Parkland High School, was drafted into the high school’s TV studio after developing animations for the F.I.R.S.T. robotics team. After familiarizing himself with all of the equipment used for Parkland Morning News’ daily show, Erik became technical director in his junior year. This year, Archibald serves as the director of the television studio at Parkland. Next year, he will be studying manufacturing engineering technology at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

Charles Horne
A sophomore at Parkland High School, Horne became interested in video production after his English teacher invited him to join the school’s TV practicum course. Since then, he has maintained a variety of positions in the practicum’s daily news program, from anchoring to stage-managing to video technician. Horne also shoots and edits a variety of stories for the broadcast that emphasize events in the school and community. Currently, he is working on orchestrating the music and designing the storyboard for the introductory clip that will precede every broadcast for the next school year. After high school, he plans to attend college and acquire a liberal-arts education.

Doug Waters
A senior at Parkland High School, Waters became interested in video production after joining his school’s TV practicum course. He is currently the technical director for the Parkland Morning News. In addition to regularly producing stories for the TV practicum’s broadcast, Waters has created two introductory leaders for Parkland Morning News. Each segment contains a unique blend of cinematography, 3-D animation, and editing. Waters plans to attend Rochester Institute of Technology and earn a degree in computer science. He will be interning at DigiNovations in Concord, Massachusetts, this summer. Waters intends to pursue a career in the visual effects industry for film.

Marilyn Madison Stinebaugh, Educator Advisor
Stinebaugh is in her 20th year as an English teacher at Parkland High School. She also runs the television studio, which includes four levels of broadcasting classes. Parkland Morning News is the apogee of this program. PMN is a student-run production that not only includes the reading of the morning announcements, but also a lead story that runs during the seven-minute homeroom period. The program is student-run, with students anchoring and directing the broadcast, as well as operating the studio equipment. Students are required to storyboard, shoot, and edit the lead stories themselves.

Related items:
  • Teen producers wow judges
  • Second place — South Burlington High School
  • Third place — Northeast High School
  • View all seven finalist videos
  • Slideshow: The judging process
  • Meet the judges
  • NEW: eSN Video Resource Center

    About the Author:

    eSchool News

    2005 Student Video Discovery Awards

    By eSchool News
    June 1st, 2005

    South Burlington High School
    Burlington, Vt.
    “SBHS Imaging Lab”

    About the video…

    “SBHS Imaging Lab” showcases the remarkable work being done by students at South Burlington High School using the school’s cutting-edge digital Imaging Lab. The video takes viewers inside the lab and includes interviews with students and administrators who describe the lab’s impact on learning. It also pays tribute to Comolli, who spearheaded the initiative.

    In a quotation that appears on screen, former Education Secretary Richard Riley notes that South Burlington students “are using state-of-the-art technology to produce computer graphics that really rival the work of the very best professionals.” Throughout the 10-minute video, viewers are treated to a stunning array of examples: A blue skirt flows across a thin white cylinder, like a dowel hanging in a clothes closet, the skirt’s bottom edge rippling out and back as it crosses over the cylinder, then flaring and flapping as the top of the skirt comes to a halt; a Lego character holding a sword rotates 360 degrees, viewed from an angle looking slightly down upon its head; short bursts of flame are snuffed out as quickly as they appear, leaving behind little curls of smoke.

    The video has a “very high production value,” said one SVDA judge, and a “clear theme that is supported very well throughout; a very nice variety of interviewees, all giving different information … [and] really nice science-on-the-spot demos of what students do.”

    In short, he said, the video is ” … very well done. The passion is clear–and these kids are talented.”

    Watch it at: http://www.eschoolnews.com/vrc/SBHSImagingLab.cfm

    Kyle Kelley
    A junior at South Burlington High School, Kelley is the captain of the football team and has always had an interest in both the technical and storytelling aspects of video. Kelley says he has acquired a passion for filmmaking in the last year. He now finds himself staying after school everyday and coming in on weekends, just to be able to work in the school’s state-of-the-art Imaging Lab. As an honor student and National Honor Society member, his selection of a college is critical to him. He intends to pursue a film and video career with a complementary background in business.

    “I’ve worked on a number of projects this year, including an adaptation of the Goethe poem Earl King–and my personal favorite, a film about a superhero,” Kelley said. “I also plan to take advantage of an internship at a local television station this summer.”

    Brian Stevenson
    Stevenson, a junior at South Burlington High, is an avid athlete and honor student. Remarkably at his age, he has already been a part of two professional movie shoots in New York City. “I was just a production assistant, but I learned so much,” he said. “It was an eye-opening experience to see the pros at work–watching the older, more experienced workers was inspiring for me as a young filmmaker.” Stevenson is currently working on a number of video projects from scripts that he has developed, as well as material for other students’ work.

    Stevenson says he is interested in many areas of filmmaking, including cinematography, direction, and production. He is still uncertain which area might best suit him. His future plans include college, but he has not yet decided what institution he will attend. “So many colleges, so many great programs–this will be difficult,” he said.

    Tim Comolli, Educator Sponsor
    Comolli has been teaching at South Burlington High School for 40 years. He came from a background in radio and television–he was the nation’s youngest disc jockey in 1957. He has taught advertising, video production, and electronic arts at South Burlington since the 1990s. Because of his background as an English teacher, Comolli’s friends and colleagues find it hard to believe that he runs one of the top high school computer graphics facilities in New England. Microsoft and Technology + Learning magazine named him the National Technology Teacher of the Year in 1999. The Vermont State Legislature passed a concurrent resolution commending him for initiating the South Burlington Imaging Lab. The National Education Association named him the national Christa McAuliffe Award recipient in 2003.

    Comolli has been awarded numerous other honors, including the University of Vermont “Teacher of the Year” (1997); Who’s Who Among Teachers (1997); the Henderson Foundation Grants winner (1999); Outstanding Alumni Award from Johnson State College (2000); ING’s “Unsung Hero” Award (2004); and many others. Comolli travels the country speaking at many technology conferences.

    You may reach Comolli at tcomolli@sbschools.net.

    Related items:
  • Teen producers wow judges
  • First place — Parkland High School
  • Third place — Northeast High School
  • View all seven finalist videos
  • Slideshow: The judging process
  • Meet the judges
  • NEW: eSN Video Resource Center

    About the Author:

    eSchool News

    2005 Student Video Discovery Awards

    By eSchool News
    June 1st, 2005

    Northeast High School
    Oakland Park, Fla.
    “One in a Million”

    About the video…

    “One in a Million” tells the powerful story of how students in this tight-knit community responded to the tragic, alcohol-induced death of a fellow student by creating a public service announcement (PSA) warning others of the dangers of drinking and driving. One SVDA judge called the video a “very dynamic, behind-the-scenes look at the use of media technology” to turn a heartbreaking loss for the community into an opportunity to save future lives.

    As part of a campaign to educate their fellow classmates about the dangers of drinking and driving, a group of television production students at Broward County’s Northeast High School conducted a survey to gauge the effectiveness of school safety campaigns. They then used what they learned to produce a special PSA for their morning television program.

    “We went through hundreds of hours of footage, and we put together 30 seconds that will open up [our classmates’] eyes to say, ‘Hey, this stuff happens, and you need to do the right thing,'” said NETV student producer Jen Campbell.

    Watch it at: http://www.eschoolnews.com/vrc/OneinaMillion.cfm

    Jen Campbell
    A junior at Northeast High School, Campbell has been involved in television production for seven years. She is the producer of the school’s daily morning show, several public service announcements, and other video segments. The films and documentaries of her production class have won many awards, and her service-learning projects have been recognized nationally. Campbell has participated in video projects for the Broward Alliance and the Oakland Park Fire Rescue Department. “Collecting Hearts” was her first film, which she wrote, directed, performed in, and produced. She has written several scripts and is currently in production on another film entitled “Birthday Girl.” In addition, Campbell is a mentor to students who are in their first year of TV and, as such, is responsible for being a leader among them and teaching them how to use the equipment.

    Of her team’s winning VDA project, Campbell says, “‘One in a Million’ has to be the most powerful video I’ve created. Its message is the most important feature of the film. It is intended to educate and encourage. I have learned more during this project than I have in any other production.”

    Campbell plans to attend the University of Central Florida and take part in its Film School after graduating from Northeast High. From there, she hopes “to continue on to be recognized as one of the great filmmakers and writers of my time.”

    Victoria Vitale
    A junior at Northeast High School, Vitale is an athlete and an artist. Her earliest videos were associated with her activities as a dancer, a junior lifeguard, and as the manager of her brother’s hockey team. Her segments for Northeast High Television (NETV) have addressed her interests in all these areas. For the “One In a Million” project, she created, disseminated, and collated a survey to assess the impact of the NETV safe driving campaign. This is where her outstanding organizational skills were an asset to NETV. Because Vitale has such a wide range of interests and talents, she is still deciding on which path to take for a future career. No matter what she chooses, she will always have the technical skills to achieve an interesting life.

    Sandy Melillo, Educator Sponsor
    Melillo is the head of the language-arts department at Northeast High School, where she has taught for 31 years. She has taught courses in English, drama, American musical theater, and TV production. NETV began 13 years ago as an offshoot of an advanced drama course after receiving honorable mention in a contest for an orange juice video that Melillo’s group produced using the library VHS camera, two VCRs, and a Mr. Microphone. NETV now edits on Macintosh computers with Final Cut Pro software.

    Melillo’s NETV students have won first-place honors in the Palm Beach, Ft. Lauderdale, and Miami Children’s film festivals and have earned finalist awards in State Farm’s Project Ignition. Because service learning is an important focus for NETV, the station has partnered with the Oakland Park Fire Rescue Department to produce a life-safety series of public service announcements and music videos to promote driving, bus, fire, and home safety for all ages. Next year, NETV will do a War History/Family History project in which students will interview family members who have participated in any world conflict. These interviews will be edited and made into a documentary. The individual tape will be sent to the Library of Congress for its archives.

    Related items:
  • Teen producers wow judges
  • First place — Parkland High School
  • Second place — South Burlington High School
  • View all seven finalist videos
  • Slideshow: The judging process
  • Meet the judges
  • NEW: eSN Video Resource Center

    About the Author:

    eSchool News

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