In the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma several public and private funders have stepped forward to assist individuals and organizations affected by the storms. Here is a list of some grants and funding resources to help schools that were in the path of the storms’ destruction or that have taken in displaced students.

  1. Several federal agencies have extended their deadlines for grant seekers residing in those parts of the Gulf Coast deemed as “disaster areas” by FEMA. Some examples include the National Endowment for the Arts, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. If you reside in the affected areas and were planning to apply for a grant this fall or early winter, be sure to check with funders to see if they will consider extending the proposal deadline for you.

  2. States affected by Katrina can apply for National Emergency Grants from the Department of Labor that can be used to employ dislocated workers temporarily. Other programs and forms of assistance are available. Go to http://www.dol.gov/opa/ hurricane-recovery.htm for more information.

  3. The National Endowment for the Humanities is offering emergency grants to libraries, museums, colleges, universities, and other cultural and historical institutions in the affected areas. Grants can be used to preserve books, records, manuscripts, art, and cultural artifacts that were damaged by flooding. For more information, go to http://www.neh.gov.

  4. The U.S. Department of Education’s (ED’s) Hurricane Help for Schools web site, http://www.ed.gov/news/hurricane/index.html, has long lists of schools that have identified their needs in the areas of desks, chairs, and computers; personal items; books and curriculum materials; school supplies; and counseling. Several schools that have taken in displaced students in other parts of the country can be found on this list. There is also a form that companies and organizations can fill out to list the supplies they are willing to provide. In addition, this web site has information about the proposals ED is making to Congress for additional funding to ease the burdens of K-12 schools and higher-education institutions.

  5. Check out the Emergency Response and Crisis Management Plans Discretionary Grants available from ED. Go to: http://www.ed.gov/programs/dvpemergencyresponse/index.html.

  6. The Rapides Foundation is offering schools in specific parishes in central Louisiana $100 for each displaced student they enroll as a result of Katrina. The grants are intended to help defray fees and other costs for these students. Go to http://www.rapidesfoundation.org for more information.

  7. Heritage Preservation has created a web page, called “Hurricane Recovery Grants and Direct Funding,” that provides information about federal agencies and national, state, and regional organizations that are offering assistance. The web page is http://www.heritagepreservation.org/PROGRAMS.TFHurricaneFund.htm.

  8. A booklet entitled “Before and After Disasters: Federal Funding for Cultural Institutions,” a guide to funding for mitigation and recovery from 15 federal grant and loan programs, is available at http://www.heritagepreservation.org/PROGRAMS/TFHurricaneRes.html.

  9. A portion of the donations received by the Bush Clinton Katrina Fund has been designated for education. For more information and a grant application, go to http://bushclintonkatrinafund.org.

  10. For current grant announcements and other information that will affect organizations helping the victims of Hurricane Katrina, visit the Grant Station clearinghouse: http://www.grantstation.com.

    Deborah Ward, CFRE, is an independent grant writing consultant. She welcomes questions at (717) 295-9437 or Debor21727@aol.com.