An Opinion piece in InsideHigherEd.com argues in response to an article in The New York Times on high-tech cheating. While not defending the practice, the author argues that there is a cost to pursuing catching cheaters as well as a tendency of instructors to miss where the real problem can be found. In some sense, the author argues, we must welcome these new technologies and methods of cheating, because they will force a change in the way various subjects are taught. Currently, there is too much “regurgitation” of facts, as opposed to critical thinking. The author raises a question initially asked in the Times: “In today’s information age, where a body of information in all but the narrowest of fields is beyond anyone’s ability to master, why aren’t colleges teaching students how to research, organize and evaluate the information that is out there?” He goes on to argue that a “dirty secret” of academia is that both bad instructors and bas assignments lead to cheating. If all the instructors want to test for is facts, spelling, memorization, etc., then students will be both willing and able to do so. Ultimately, what must be gained from education is the processing of available information…