The Associated Press reports that many students are eschewing the traditional yearbook model in favor of an online version. Though the use of MyYearbook.com, students can take part in traditional yearbook activities such as voting for “most likely to succeed,” exchanging notes, and posting photos and videos. The site creators, siblings Catherine and David Cook, are confident that their generation will trust the internet with their school memories. Catherine Cook, 16, says: “We just think yearbooks are obsolete … if you think about it, all you’re going to do with it is put it on the shelf and never really look at it.” Through the site, students have access to multimedia that a traditional yearbook can’t offer. In addition, other students can “autograph” each other’s pages, giving a new media twist to an old tradition. However, skeptics question whether a web site could ever truly replace the traditional yearbook. After all, if something should happen to the site, that information could be lost. Or more importantly, who wants to lug a laptop around to class reunions? …