Philly.com reports that only half the states responding to a Philadelphia Inquirer survey do any kind of statistical analysis of test scores to uncover instances of widespread cheating. After reporters pointed out in 2005 that standardized test scores at some Camden, NJ schools rose at inexplicable rates, school officials hadn’t noticed the problem. With all of the money and prestige that hands in the balance of standardized test scores in the NCLB era, the amount of schools on the lookout for cheating isn’t as high as it could be. Mary Jane Michalak, a spokeswoman for the Indiana Department of Education, says: “We assume that people are not cheating, unless we see a red flag.” At the moment, there is not a federal requirement that education departments take a proactive approach in regards to cheating investigations. Instead, experts have to rely on media reports, and those media reports suggest that irregularities are on the rise…