In a column for the St. Petersburg Times, Howard Troxler opines that government eMail inboxes should provide equal access to all. Last fall, there was a dispute over scheduling religious holidays in Hillsborough County. During the dispute, the Hillsborough County School Board received a flood of eMails from the Florida Family Association, who had set up a web site for users to contact the school board. With eMails flooding in at the rate of one every few seconds, the school board thought it was under some kind of attack, and ordered all eMails from that address blocked. After determining the next day that the eMails were in fact legitimate, the block was ordered to be removed. The problem is that it took another full day for the block to be lifted–a development that the board claims was a mistake. David Caton, leader of the Florida Family Association disagrees with this claim, and feels his group was unfairly denied access to contact the school board, thus denying him and his organization the right to petition the government for redress. Given this scenario, Troxler argues that while no one has an inherent right to eMail the government. However, once the government does accept eMails from one group, it cannot subsequently selectively allow or block communications from specific groups…