SignOnSanDiego.com reports that over the last decade, the state of California has spent over $70 million on a student-tracking system with the aim of analyzing test scores and other data to improve student performance. However, the system is still years away. Because of this, California has fallen behind Texas, Florida, and some other large states in being able to measure school dropout rates. California is believed to have a dropout of 29 percent, with an astounding 50 percent dropout rate for black and Latino males. However, the state has been reporting a dropout rate of 13 percent, so as to avoid a cut in federal funding. The tracking system that could provide reliable numbers has been delayed for several reasons, disinterest, budgetary concerns, infighting, and a fear of a repeat of a computer fiasco that recently plagued the state DMV. Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O’Connell criticized lawmakers and said of the situation: “It is frankly shameful that well into the first decade of the 21st-century, the state that is home to Silicon Valley can’t provide accurate graduation and dropout rates.” John Mockler, former education secretary for former Governor Gray Davis, echoed this sentiment by adding: “It’s shameful that the state of technology doesn’t have a technology system to track students over time … It’s embarrassing.” …