CNN.com reports that the Illinois Emergency Management Agency has launched a program this month that will help schools safely dispose of radioactive materials normally used in classroom instruction. Agency officials will now collect radioactive materials and send them to a disposal facility. For decades, school science labs have used low-level radioactive samples in physics and chemistry classes. Leftover samples from experiments are typically sealed and stored in closets or storerooms. However, due to teacher retirement, new lessons, and new samples coming in, it is very easy for a school to lose track of the samples they already have, and how they are stored. Radiation discoveries aren’t even necessarily limited to science labs. One Colorado high school had a chunk of ore collected from a field trip. The problem was that the ore was radioactive, and anyone who walked by the ore received quite a high does of radiation. While there is a real educational need for radioactive materials in schools, they can prove to be a problem if handled incorrectly. Experts believe that the most common cause of such problems is that schools do not keep accurate inventories of their storage closets and materials…