KAALTV.com reports that initiatives in the state of Minnesota such as a focus on STEM education hope to increase interest in math and science. However, some smaller school districts may not be in a financial position to push these initiatives. One such district, Grand Meadow, says that it will take a couple of years in order to get what it needs to increase new math and science requirements. The district hopes that increased attention paid to these types of courses statewide will result in more funding for smaller schools and districts. The Grand Meadow students, teachers, and the superintendent all wish they had faster computers, better lab equipment, and microscopes. While Grand Meadow was one of the first school districts to require four years of math and science for graduation, some of the school’s microscopes are so old, one has to use a mirror to reflect enough light into the classroom to get the microscopes to work…