The New York Times reports that when the One Laptop Per Child project was announced, many computer industry executives ridiculed the idea. The plan centers on a $100 laptop that could be distributed to developing areas of the world. But executives wondered, “How can this be accomplished, when screens themselves cost $100?” Advances made in reducing manufacturing cost and power consumption helped drive down the cost of production of the laptop, even if the price of the is now closer to $150, rather than the originally stated $100. These advances have allowed the project to win over a share of its skeptics. Still, debate ensues. The current version of the laptop does not come with Windows or even a hard drive, and the screen is small. Industry giants Microsoft and Intel are noted detractors of the project, and are pushing their own approaches. Bill Gates has openly questioned the program, wondering if the concept is “just taking what we do in the rich world” and assuming it is good for the developing world as well” …