The Washington Post reports that two years ago, every student attending T.C. Williams High received a wireless laptop computer. Officials described the initiative as a way to try to close the digital divide. However, the program hasn’t been as successful as some had hoped. Some students have said that they ignored the machines from the beginning, while teachers admit to some hesitation in incorporating the laptops into lessons. Meanwhile, critics of the program derided the laptops as “expensive paperweights,” and school board members openly questioned their academic payoff. Scott Newsham, a school board member and father of a T.C. Williams student, says that he thinks the decision to integrate the laptops into the school was made before there was a thorough understanding of what to do with them. While many educators see school-issued laptops as the way of the future, and there is some studies that show that test scores and laptops are related, according to Larry Cuban, a professor emeritus of education at Stanford University, there is no evidence that shows simply handing out laptops will raise test scores or close the achievement gap…