Wired.com reports that as Wi-Fi increasingly penetrates homes, businesses, and the public sector, they have become central in a struggle that has spanned decades of debate. Both Proponents and skeptics of the idea of electromagnetic field sensitivity face a conundrum when determining whether or not wireless technology, cell phones, microwaves, and even computers pose a health threat. While the idea is supported by peer-reviewed research, it flunks major tests. Individuals who say they suffer from the condition feel that both their sanity and symptoms are under attack. Some describe the condition as described the sensation of the affliction as being “prodded all over your body by 1,000 fingers” when in the presence of a Wi-Fi signal. Michael Bevington fell ill, and blamed a recently installed Wi-Fi network at his school because when he returns to his home on weekends, he feels fine. Sufferers of the condition report headaches, nausea, upset stomach, tinnitus, and short-term memory problems. However, skeptics believe blaming this on EMF sensitivity serves as a convenient answer to almost any medical problem. Michael Shermer, publisher of Skeptic magazine says of the situation: “There is no known mechanism by which EMF from any source–power lines, cell phones or Wi-Fi networks–can cause health problems of any kind.” In addition, scientists have long-recognized the dangers of high-frequency ionizing radiation such as nuclear fallout, however, non-ionizing radiation such as broadcasts, Wi-Fi, etc., have long been considered safe, as they cannot break down atomic bonds…