CNET reports that while many educators disdain the idea of video games in classrooms, the military uses them train soldiers, teenagers with cancer use them to fight their disease virtually, and some surgeons use them to keep their hands nimble. Now, a U.S. professor is advocating that schools consider using video games as one tool that can help better prepare students for the modern work force. David Williamson Shaffer, an education science professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, believes that schools should use video games, as they can help children prepare for work–where juggling different technologies is a daily requirement. Shaffer says that “People think that the way we teach kids in schools is the natural way we should learn. But young people in the United States today are being prepared for standardized jobs in a world that will, very soon, punish those can’t innovate.” Shaffer argues that the current system was designed in the 1800s to prepare American students for the industrial era. Now, we should be encouraging students to practice listening to music while playing games, watching videos, surfing the web and learning different subject matter, as this will more closely approximate the challenges awaiting them in the modern, global workforce…