A column for the New York Times opines that most people aren’t equipped to grasp the true magnitude of $1.2 trillion. Because people don’t deal with a trillion of anything in everyday life, when they encounter such a big number, they have hard time distinguishing it from any other huge number. One way to come to grips with this reality is to think in terms of what that amount of money can actually purchase. With $1.2 trillion, the United States could double the amount of money spend on cancer research funding, treatment for every citizen with diabetes or heart disease whose problems are unmanaged, and a global immunization campaign. Running these initiatives for a decade would only use up half of the available money. Next, one could establish universal preschool for every 3 and 4 year-old in the country. One could also give the city of New Orleans a huge influx of funds, and give a big chunk of money to national security. Or, one could spend $1.2 trillion on the Iraq war. According to some estimates, the war is costing about $300 million per day in day-to-day operations. The two best-known analyses of the war put the total cost around $2 trillion range, however those also include indirect costs, such as the economic stimulus of those funds had they been spent in this country…