NEW YORK (Jan. 24, 2007) – Beginning in 2006 the national debate on math education intensified when President Bush introduced the American Competitiveness Initiative, which focused on improving students´ math and science skills to maintain the nation´s competitive edge in the global economy. Key findings from recent online surveys of visitors to the Pokémon Learning League web site, released today by Pokémon USA, Inc., indicate teachers and students seek an interactive online learning environment, particularly for math education. Parents also support digital media use in the classroom, according to results from another survey Pokémon USA announced today.

–Pokémon Learning League, the web-based suite of animated, interactive lessons in language arts, math, science, and life skills for grades 3-6, was made available in early October 2006 for everyone to access free-of-charge for a trial period. Since then, the web site, www.PokemonLearningLeague.com, has received 230,000 visitors.

–Teachers and students are frequently turning to Pokémon Learning League for engaging math content. 48 percent of the 414 students who responded to the survey indicated they need or use the math lessons the most, and 58 percent of the 79 teachers who responded to a survey launched this month said the same. In addition, 37 percent of students and 41 percent of teachers said they visit the Pokémon Learning League web site every day.

–The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics recommendations for math education in the era of NCLB include: students should learn and experience math in a standards-based classroom, students need several opportunities to apply basic skills to problem-solving, and students should be empowered to use a full range of technology tools. Pokémon Learning League´s format and standards-based content meet these recommendations.

–Pokémon Learning League lessons use the watch-try-apply method of instruction to move students from understanding a concept to applying it in interactive challenges that require problem-solving skills. 88 percent of teachers think the watch-try-apply method used in the program is excellent, and 72 percent of students agree the method helps them learn.

–The online interactive learning environment provided by Pokémon Learning League is appealing to teachers, students and parents. A large majority of teachers and students like the style of animation and use of Pokémon characters as a supplemental teaching tool. A survey conducted by Braun Research for Pokémon USA examined the attitudes and beliefs of a random sample of 500 parents and guardians of children in grades 3-6. The survey revealed 51 percent of parents believe interactive online learning tools that feature their children´s favorite cartoon characters would better engage their children in the learning process and in school work. 73 percent of parents believe their children would be interested in online learning tools that extend classroom lessons into home activities.

Kristin Bennett, Ph.D., mathematics professor at Wake Forest University and a member of the Pokémon Learning League Advisory Board, remarked: "Pokémon Learning League´s web-based, interactive lessons provide an excellent opportunity for students to hone their mathematical skills. The survey results indicate the success of purposeful planning of standards-based educational content that reflects best practices in the marriage of technology and math education. Increasing students´ mathematical literacy will continue to be a priority for K-12 educators. Pokémon Learning League has identified a method that motivates students to self-engage in mathematical learning and practice, and it is well known that self-motivation is a key predictor of academic success. The fact that teachers and parents also find the animated episodes to be appealing further strengthens the value of this online educational tool."
To learn more about Pokémon Learning League, visit booth #1379 during the Florida Educational Technology Conference, Jan. 24-26. The paid subscription service to Pokémon Learning League, which will include several new lessons and a lesson planning and assessment feature, will begin in February.

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