The San Francisco Chronicle reports that for the past three years, Bryan Osborne begins his computer-literacy classes by asking students to find the best place to plant a milkweed plant to attract monarch butterflies. According to Osborne, this is the type of question that isn’t asked nearly enough, and should be asked more–even if it’s in computer class. Osborne believes that because of all the “state-mandated stuff,” there is a lack of conservation education. There isn’t a test for it, and no one has time to teach conservation because of all the other subjects that need to be covered. Because of this dynamic, Osborne wants to make sure that his students understand how computers can be used to help answer environmental questions. Previously, melding technology with biology was a capital-intensive process, as the equipment was prohibitively expensive. Now that equipment prices have dropped significantly, melding the two subjects is easier than ever before…

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2007/02/17/HOGVDO4RMP1.DTL