A viewpoint article on Wired.com argues that in the name of “protecting the children,” we are confusing innocence with ignorance. Next week, substitute teacher Julie Amero of Norwich, Connecticut, receives her sentence for exposing students to pornography in the classroom. She faces a prison term of up to 40 years. Prosecutors claim that Amero deliberately visited pornographic sites on a school computer, and allowed her charges to view the content. Amero claims that the computer got hit with a pop-up frenzy that she wasn’t able to stop. However, tech-savvy lawyers are pointing out glaring errors made by both sides in the case. In addition, computer forensics experts have been re-creating the incident. The opinion piece argues that while Julie Amero is taking the fall, many other people failed before porn forced its way into the classroom. The IT department failed to keep filters up-to-date, and enforce a security policy. Administration failed to ensure that all teachers had the necessary skills and training to handle internet surprises. Furthermore, the community fails to protect the children in the example it is setting. Some of Amero’s students mentioned the incident to their parents, who subsequently complained to the school’s administration. The district informed the parents that Julie wouldn’t be teaching there any longer. However, the community didn’t stop there, and insisted on an “aggressive police response,” which resulted in Amero being arrested for deliberately exposing children to pornography–even though nobody bothered to check the computer for malware first…

http://www.wired.com/