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    ED enhances its free collection of learning resources

    http://www.free.ed.gov
    March 1st, 2007

    The U.S. Department of Education has unveiled a newly remodeled and updated version of its Federal Resources for Education Excellence (FREE) web site. This is the first time FREE has been redesigned since it was created in 1998. Though the design is new, the goal of FREE remains the same–to make it easier for educators to find more than 1,500 teaching and learning resources from the federal government. The new design features improved navigation, more images, and access to richer, more expansive content for teachers and students. To help you quickly find appropriate resources for your classrooms, a new “subject map” shows more than 100 available topics, as well as the number of resources contained within each topic. These include primary-source historical documents, lesson plans, science visualizations, math simulations and online challenges, paintings, photos, mapping tools, and more. Resources are provided by federal organizations and agencies such as the Library of Congress, National Archives, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution, National Science Foundation, and NASA.

    ED enhances its free collection of learning resources

    http://www.free.ed.gov
    March 1st, 2007

    The U.S. Department of Education has unveiled a newly remodeled and updated version of its Federal Resources for Education Excellence (FREE) web site. This is the first time FREE has been redesigned since it was created in 1998. Though the design is new, the goal of FREE remains the same–to make it easier for educators to find more than 1,500 teaching and learning resources from the federal government. The new design features improved navigation, more images, and access to richer, more expansive content for teachers and students. To help you quickly find appropriate resources for your classrooms, a new “subject map” shows more than 100 available topics, as well as the number of resources contained within each topic. These include primary-source historical documents, lesson plans, science visualizations, math simulations and online challenges, paintings, photos, mapping tools, and more. Resources are provided by federal organizations and agencies such as the Library of Congress, National Archives, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution, National Science Foundation, and NASA.