The New York Times reports that a recent telephone survey conducted by the Pew Internet and American Life Project found that 53 percent of parents said they used web filters and 45 percent said they employed monitoring devices. Web filters allow parents to control access to web content in various ways. One can filter by "blacklist," forbidding access based on categories. Or, one can filter by "white list," only allowing access to specifically approved web sites. However, according to Danielle Yates, a spokeswoman for GetNetWise.org, filtering is not a "silver bullet," as bad stuff does get through. One step beyond filtering is monitoring software. While these programs can also block web access, it is really only the beginning. These programs can log activity, enforce time limits on computer use, alert parents of inappropriate computer activity, and even read details of instant-messaging chats…

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/14/technology/14shortcuts.html?ex=1177387200&en=893aaf7a402bad51&ei=5070&emc=eta1

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