Arlington, Va. — The American Association of School Administrators, the professional organization for school superintendents and other school system leaders, today issued the following statement on the Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll of the Public´s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools released today:

"The PDK/Gallup Poll results reveal a steady and significant erosion in public support for the No Child Left Behind law over the last four years. The fact is, the more people know about the law, the less they like it.

"AASA was the first educational association to oppose the passage of No Child Left Behind in 2001, and we are heartened that the public has come to recognize the fatal flaws in the law, and to demand a better way of measuring student success.

"Among its many flaws, No Child Left Behind — a nickname applied to the 2001 reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act — has narrowed the curriculum and focused on test results to the exclusion of a broader educational experience. AASA has outlined recommendations for a new and improved version of the ESEA [available at http://www.aasa.org/policy/content.cfm?ItemNumber=8683].

"On the more positive side, the PDK/Gallup Poll results reveal a high level of support among the American people for the schools in their communities. This support is critical to the success of public education. For the most part, the more the public knows about their schools, the better they like them. School system leaders should be proud of this trend, while recognizing that we need to continue to build systems that support educators and emphasize meaningful and engaged learning for all students."

About AASA
The American Association of School Administrators, founded in 1865, is the professional organization for more than 13,000 educational leaders across the United States. AASA´s mission is to support and develop effective school system leaders who are dedicated to the highest quality public education for all children. AASA´s major focus is standing up for public education. For more information, visit www.aasa.org.

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