The American Association of University Women, whose 1992 report on how girls are shortchanged in the classroom caused a national debate over gender equity, has turned its attention to debunking the idea of a "boys’ crisis," the New York Times reports. "Girls’ gains have not come at boys’ expense," says a new report by the group, to be released May 20 in Washington, D.C. Echoing research released two years ago by the American Council on Education and other groups, the report says that while girls have for years graduated from high school and college at a higher rate than boys, the largest disparities in educational achievement are not between boys and girls, but between those of different races, ethnicities, and income levels. In examining a range of standardized test scores, the report finds some intriguing nuggets about the interplay of family income, race, ethnicity, and academic performance. For example, it finds that while boys generally outperform girls on both the math and verbal parts of the SAT, the male advantage on the verbal test is consistent only among low-income students, and that among black students, there was no consistent advantage by sex from 1994 to 2004…

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