WASHINGTON DC (August 25th, 2009) – Curriki, the largest online community for creating and sharing open source K-12 curricula, was asked by the Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement (OII) to provide a continuity of learning plan for states, school districts, and individuals as part of a nationwide readiness initiative for a possible resurgence of the H1N1 virus.

Curriki’s continuity of learning plan includes access to a free and open repository of teaching and learning resources built on an open platform that can be customized for individual states or school districts.  Like an iTunes playlist, users of Curriki can create collections of free and open educational resources, along with repositories of other supplemental content. If a teacher prefers one lesson to another, he or she can easily swap content in or out to meet the individual needs of the students.  States or school districts can take advantage of customized landing pages designed to provide specific information, news, resources, and links to their education stakeholders.  Additionally, Curriki’s group function allow members of a district, school, or community to stay connected and privately share resources, communicate and post news and collaborate on projects from any location.

More details on the Continuity of Learning plan can be viewed at: http://www.curriki.org/xwiki/bin/view/Demo/ContinuityofLearning. 

A sample state or district landing page can be viewed at: http://www.curriki.org/xwiki/bin/view/Demo/SampleStateLandingPage.

“Curriki has always been committed to sharing our platform and large collection of high quality curriculum at no cost,” said Dr. Barbara “Bobbi” Kurshan, Executive Director of Curriki.  By working with the Department of Education, we can further provide a solution for states, districts, schools, teachers, and the parents of students who will find themselves unable to attend school in the unfortunate event of a flu epidemic.”

Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, at a recent back-to-school event recently mentioned the importance of resources, including Curriki, in providing guidance and expertise to educators on how learning can continue in the event of student absences due to seasonal and novel H1N1 flu.

“We can all work to keep ourselves healthy now by practicing prevention, close monitoring and using common sense,” Secretary Duncan said. ”We know that some students may be affected by H1N1. And our top priority is making sure that they have a way to get well, stay well and to keep learning. With these recommendations, we’re providing a menu of strategies for educators to help ensure that the learning process will continue.”

Curriki has more than 80,000 registered members and more than 400 groups with access to more than 30,000 free, open source learning assets.  Curriki logs more than 175,000 unique visitors per month from teachers representing more than 200 countries/territories around the world. Curriki’s impact is measured by the global usage of its instructional resources, which are currently being used to teach more than an estimated 4.7 million students around the world.

For more information, visit http://www.curriki.org

 

About Curriki

Curriki is a not-for-profit organization committed to eliminating the education divide.  Through an open source platform, Curriki delivers free and peer reviewed K-12 curricula as well as collaboration tools to teachers, students and parents around the world. By increasing teacher engagement in curriculum development, Curriki positively impacts teacher effectiveness and student performance. Curriki’s community of educators includes more than 80,000 members and shares more than 30,000 learning assets.  To learn more, please visit www.curriki.org or phone 202-626.8529. 

 

About the Author:

eSchool News