Principals Essentials, Inc. Launches a new series of Motivation Posters designed to improve student performance.

Scarsdale, NY, November 21, 2009 — Principals Essentials, Inc. is a motivation and creative design consultancy that creates innovative and effective incentive concepts through cleverly crafted messages for educators. The principle goal of these messages in poster format is to encourage Americas youth to get serious about their education by staying in school, doing their homework, improving academic performance and becoming more productive to benefit themselves, society and the nation as a whole.
 
Principals Essentials apply the same basic creative marketing strategies and techniques that are employed successfully by major firms to motivate their employees and sales personnel. A series of cleverly conceived and designed messages are used as daily reminders, which are strategically placed throughout the school to heighten interest and improve student performance.
 
Principal Essentials believes that filling student minds with positive reinforcement will help them to take their studies more seriously, stay in school and become better citizens and more productive members of society. Principals Essentials provide a full range of creative copy and design services for schools to utilize. Their services include: school identity programs, learning strategies, creating student, parent and teacher communications, environmental awareness and rewarding positive achievement. Their new poster series includes creative visual presentations reinforcing the benefits of class attendance, study encouragement, graduation/ anti drop-out messages, athleticism and healthy living, as well as drug use issues and pregnancy prevention. All can be used as produced or customized with school name or logotypes.
 
According to Mr. Lawrence, Outside of school a student is exposed to 750 advertising messages a day from the general media. They are bombarded with ads on TV, radio, and billboards and now even the Internet. While they are in school we must present them with messages extolling the many positive benefits of becoming serious about their education!

Principals Essentials was founded by Joe Lawrence. Joe’s successful career in international consumer marketing spans 20 years serving such prestigious clients like Proctor and Gamble, Richards and Vicks, Fuji, Omega and Maryknoll.
 
For information: http://principalsessentials.com or Contact: joe@principalsessentials.com
Phone: (914) 725-2927
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Fantasy Party Hire – For all your party needs, Servicing Western Australia

Fantasy Party hire has a reputation of making your event the one you will be talking about for years to come.  We specialize in the hire of bouncy castles, bucking bulls, bucking penis, bucking surfboar, marquees, tables, chairs, frozen cocktail machines, slushee machines, fairy floss machines, popcorn machines, catering and general party hire.
 
Fantasy Party Hire delivers all around the Perth Metropolitan area, inclusive of Rockingham, Midland and Clarkson.
 
Servicing Western Australia
 
Our Promise to you:
 
A) Is that all of our stock will look as new in perfect condition
B) All of our operators are approachable, presentable and highly experienced
C) You will have fun safely
D) You will enjoy your event
E) We will turn up when we say
 
 
Contact us today on (08) 9467 7497 or 042 1973 895 for an obligation free quote or to request further information, or visit our websites today with all prices readily available.

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UNC WILMINGTON STUDY SHOWS EDUCATIONAL VIDEO GAMES POSITIVELY INFLUENCE STUDENT ATTITUDES TOWARD MATH

New York, Nov. 23, 2009 – Academic researchers at the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) have concluded that educational video games positively influence student achievement and significantly affect student attitudes and self-efficacy toward the study of mathematics. The results follow a 16-week comprehensive research study conducted by UNCW’s Watson School of Education using Tabula Digita’s DimensionM™ standards-based educational video game series. 

 

Participants in the evaluation included 250 middle school students, 10 middle school mathematics teachers, and two computer resource teachers from four schools in Southeastern North Carolina. Participating schools were West Pender and Cape Fear middle schools in Pender County and Trask and D.C. Virgo middle schools in New Hanover County.

 

“We hoped our research would explain how playing serious, high quality, interactive video games such as DimensionM influences student achievement and self-efficacy in mathematics,” said Albert Ritzhaupt, assistant professor in the Watson School of Education and lead researcher of the study. “It not only demonstrated the impact of gaming on students, but we likewise learned a great deal about educators’ responses to and interactions with this new method of learning.”

 

The DimensionM instructional video games used in the study are designed to teach and reinforce key math concepts through a series of cutting-edge, first-person action adventure missions that incorporate three-dimensional graphics, sound, animation and storylines comparable to those in popular video games. Students practice and master math concepts previously discussed in class by successfully navigating a myriad of middle school level math and algebra lessons embedded in the game. The purpose of the game is to help students absorb the complexities of math by presenting them in a format that is fun and engaging.

 

Student evaluation of DimensionM was positive: More than 90 percent indicated that some or most of the activities were fun; approximately 67 percent felt the activities were just right in their level of complexity, and about 89 percent believed DimensionM allowed them to demonstrate some or most of their mathematics skills and knowledge. The broad evaluation examined student attitudes toward mathematics, mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics achievement before and after the research study was conducted. Mathematics achievement was measured by student performance on a low-stakes assessment linked to North Carolina middle grades standards. 

 

Ritzhaupt added, “During our post-research focus group, teachers were asked if they thought the relationship had changed between them and their students as a result of integrating the educational game. All teachers, 100 percent, answered that the relationship had changed, indicating that many felt that the students now saw them in a different way.”

 

The teachers described a closer, more personal connection to their students. One teacher stated that, “Students find gaming exciting and the mere fact that I was offering it in my classroom made a connection.  It made me ‘more cool’ to them.”    

 

“The use of modern educational games in formal K-12 settings is at a tipping point,” said Ntiedo Etuk, chief executive officer of Tabula Digita. “Research has shown that 97 percent of teenagers play video games, and that the amount of time gamers devote to playing video games is three times greater than what they devote to any other activities. So imagine what could be accomplished in a classroom where serious educational video games are readily available – the sky’s the limit.”

 

Ritzhaupt was joined in the research endeavor by assistant professor Heidi Higgins and technology coordinator/lecturer Beth Allred, both in the Watson School of Education.

 

About Tabula Digita

Tabula Digita is the world leader in the development of innovative educational video games. Research-based and aligned to state standards, the award-winning DimensionM and League of Scientists instructive tools currently support math and science curriculum for elementary, middle and high school students. 

 

Through its fusion of collaborative, content-rich, immersive learning environments, Tabula Digita’s single and multiplayer products have been proven highly effective in increasing student engagement, time on task, and achievement scores. Tabula Digita games are currently being used in school districts across the country including New York City Public Schools, Chicago Public Schools, Broward County Public Schools and the Ft. Worth Independent School District in Texas. 

 

In 2008,Tabula Digita’s DimensionM gaming series was named the Best Educational Game/Simulation from the Software Industry Information Association (SIIA).  For more information, please call 1-877-6-TABULA or 1-877-682-2852 or visit www.DimensionM.com.

 

About the University of North Carolina Wilmington

The University of North Carolina Wilmington is a comprehensive public master’s university focused on high quality teaching, research and outreach. UNCW offers bachelor’s degrees in 52 majors, 35 master’s degrees, a Ph.D. in marine biology and an Ed.D. in educational leadership. For the eleventh consecutive year, UNCW is ranked among the top 10 public master’s universities in the South by U.S. News and World Report. The university was also named among the 2010 “Best in the Southeast” by The Princeton Review, for the sixth consecutive year. For more information, visit www.uncw.edu.

 

 

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UNC WILMINGTON STUDY SHOWS EDUCATIONAL VIDEO GAMES POSITIVELY INFLUENCE STUDENT ATTITUDES TOWARD MATH

New York, Nov. 23, 2009 – Academic researchers at the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) have concluded that educational video games positively influence student achievement and significantly affect student attitudes and self-efficacy toward the study of mathematics. The results follow a 16-week comprehensive research study conducted by UNCW’s Watson School of Education using Tabula Digita’s DimensionM™ standards-based educational video game series. 

 

Participants in the evaluation included 250 middle school students, 10 middle school mathematics teachers, and two computer resource teachers from four schools in Southeastern North Carolina. Participating schools were West Pender and Cape Fear middle schools in Pender County and Trask and D.C. Virgo middle schools in New Hanover County.

 

“We hoped our research would explain how playing serious, high quality, interactive video games such as DimensionM influences student achievement and self-efficacy in mathematics,” said Albert Ritzhaupt, assistant professor in the Watson School of Education and lead researcher of the study. “It not only demonstrated the impact of gaming on students, but we likewise learned a great deal about educators’ responses to and interactions with this new method of learning.”

 

The DimensionM instructional video games used in the study are designed to teach and reinforce key math concepts through a series of cutting-edge, first-person action adventure missions that incorporate three-dimensional graphics, sound, animation and storylines comparable to those in popular video games. Students practice and master math concepts previously discussed in class by successfully navigating a myriad of middle school level math and algebra lessons embedded in the game. The purpose of the game is to help students absorb the complexities of math by presenting them in a format that is fun and engaging.

 

Student evaluation of DimensionM was positive: More than 90 percent indicated that some or most of the activities were fun; approximately 67 percent felt the activities were just right in their level of complexity, and about 89 percent believed DimensionM allowed them to demonstrate some or most of their mathematics skills and knowledge. The broad evaluation examined student attitudes toward mathematics, mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics achievement before and after the research study was conducted. Mathematics achievement was measured by student performance on a low-stakes assessment linked to North Carolina middle grades standards. 

 

Ritzhaupt added, “During our post-research focus group, teachers were asked if they thought the relationship had changed between them and their students as a result of integrating the educational game. All teachers, 100 percent, answered that the relationship had changed, indicating that many felt that the students now saw them in a different way.”

 

The teachers described a closer, more personal connection to their students. One teacher stated that, “Students find gaming exciting and the mere fact that I was offering it in my classroom made a connection.  It made me ‘more cool’ to them.”    

 

“The use of modern educational games in formal K-12 settings is at a tipping point,” said Ntiedo Etuk, chief executive officer of Tabula Digita. “Research has shown that 97 percent of teenagers play video games, and that the amount of time gamers devote to playing video games is three times greater than what they devote to any other activities. So imagine what could be accomplished in a classroom where serious educational video games are readily available – the sky’s the limit.”

 

Ritzhaupt was joined in the research endeavor by assistant professor Heidi Higgins and technology coordinator/lecturer Beth Allred, both in the Watson School of Education.

 

About Tabula Digita

Tabula Digita is the world leader in the development of innovative educational video games. Research-based and aligned to state standards, the award-winning DimensionM and League of Scientists instructive tools currently support math and science curriculum for elementary, middle and high school students. 

 

Through its fusion of collaborative, content-rich, immersive learning environments, Tabula Digita’s single and multiplayer products have been proven highly effective in increasing student engagement, time on task, and achievement scores. Tabula Digita games are currently being used in school districts across the country including New York City Public Schools, Chicago Public Schools, Broward County Public Schools and the Ft. Worth Independent School District in Texas. 

 

In 2008,Tabula Digita’s DimensionM gaming series was named the Best Educational Game/Simulation from the Software Industry Information Association (SIIA).  For more information, please call 1-877-6-TABULA or 1-877-682-2852 or visit www.DimensionM.com.

 

About the University of North Carolina Wilmington

The University of North Carolina Wilmington is a comprehensive public master’s university focused on high quality teaching, research and outreach. UNCW offers bachelor’s degrees in 52 majors, 35 master’s degrees, a Ph.D. in marine biology and an Ed.D. in educational leadership. For the eleventh consecutive year, UNCW is ranked among the top 10 public master’s universities in the South by U.S. News and World Report. The university was also named among the 2010 “Best in the Southeast” by The Princeton Review, for the sixth consecutive year. For more information, visit www.uncw.edu.

 

 

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Duncan to attend AASCU meeting in San Antonio, TX

MEDIA ADVISORY

American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU)

 

U.S. Education Secretary to Address AASCU Meeting in San Antonio

 

State college and university presidents will meet next week with Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to discuss key issues such as $4 billion in new stimulus bill funding for education and the legislation moving through Congress on student loans and grants. The secretary will also be available for media questions following his address to annual meeting of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU).

 

DATE: November 24, 2009

TIME: Address to the general session 7:45 a.m., media availability 8:40-9:00 a.m.

 

LOCATION: Grand Hyatt San Antonio?600 E Market Street ?San Antonio, TX

 

CONTACT: If you are interested in attending please contact:

Susan Chilcott, 202-478-4661 (o)

                         703-332-9351 (cell)

                          chilcotts@aascu.org

 

Gretchen Cook, 202-478-4665

                          cookg@aascu.org

 

Jennifer Herrera, 202-478-4665

                            herreraj@aascu.org

 

 

###

AASCU is the leadership association of 430 public colleges and universities Delivering America’s Promise through their common commitments to access, affordability and educational opportunity. Enrolling more than 3 million students, these institutions fulfill the expectations of a public university by working for the public good through education, stewardship and engagement, thereby improving the lives of people in their community, their region and their state.

 

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SIIA Announces the Online Ed Tech Business Forum

 

Washington, D.C. (Nov. 20, 2009) – The Education Division of the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) today announced that, due to the sellout at its upcoming Ed Tech Business Forum, it plans to broadcast the event live via Webcast.  The conference will be held Nov. 30 and Dec. 1, 2009, in New York.

 

The SIIA Ed Tech Business Forum is the nation’s foremost executive event focused on building revenue and profits for companies in the education technology market.  In this year’s Forum, executives from top organizations will share their experiences in conducting business in a global market.  In addition, the program will focus on the economic landscape for companies looking at financing options now as well as future growth opportunities.

 

Online participants will have access to a robust program, including:

 

— The Innovation Incubator Business Profiles Session on Monday, Nov. 30th, at 4 p.m. EST

 

— General sessions on Tuesday, Dec. 1st, which run from 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. EST:

  – Embracing the Global Opportunities…Before It’s Too Late

  – Where are the Investment Dollars for Ed Tech Companies?  Is this the Best of Times or the Worst of Times?

  – What Does a Post-Stimulus World Look Like?

 

Luncheon Keynote by Karen Cator, Director of Education Technology, U.S. Department of Education, on Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. EST

 

— Seminar sessions with interactive presentations on a range of practical topics on Tuesday from 2 p.m. – 5 p.m. EST

 

— And, special online-only discussions with session moderators and key panelists.

 

During the Online Forum, participants will be able to ask questions of the speakers and chat with other online participants.  The Online Ed Tech Business Forum is made possible through a partnership with LearningTimes, the leading producer of online communities and online conferences for education and training.  For more information about LearningTimes, visit www.LearningTimes.net.

 

SIIA members can participate in the Online Forum for $195, while the fee for non-members is $295.  For more information regarding the event or to register to attend, visit www.edtechbusinessforum.net.  Login details will be sent to registrants via email prior to the start of the Forum.

 

Media and bloggers interested in attending the conference should complete the online press registration form, or contact John Crosby at jcrosby@siia.net to apply for press credentials.

 

About SIIA

The Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) is the principal trade association for the software and digital content industry.  SIIA provides global services in government relations, business development, corporate education and intellectual property protection for more than 500 leading software and information companies.  For further information, visit www.siia.net.

 

About SIIA’s Education Division

SIIA’s Education Division serves and represents more than 150 member companies that provide software, digital content and other technologies that address educational needs.  The Division shapes and supports the industry by providing leadership, advocacy, business development opportunities and critical market information.  SIIA provides a neutral business forum for its members to understand business models, technological advancements, market trends, and best practices.  With the leadership of the Division Board and collaborative efforts with educators and other stakeholders, the Division undertakes initiatives to enhance the use of educational technology and the success of SIIA members.

 

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Utah, video-gaming industry launch web safety initiative

On Nov. 18, Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff and Michael D. Gallagher, president and CEO of the Entertainment Software Association, announced the availability of a free program — Wired With Wisdom — aimed at addressing internet threats to children through improved parental education, reports the Deseret News. The online tutorial, created by the nonprofit organization Web Wise Kids, is designed to teach adults how to keep children safe from actual and virtual harm online. Issues addressed include eMail safety, the creation of personal web sites, the use of social media sites like MySpace and Facebook, and cyber bullying. The web-based program is designed so that "even the least internet-savvy parent can understand these topics that our e-generation is now so eagerly embracing," Gallagher said. Utah joins five other states–Arizona, California, Florida, Virginia, and Washington–in adopting Wired With Wisdom. Shurtleff said he views the program as a vital component of the state’s ongoing fight against cyber predators who target children…

Click here for the full story

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UC’s 32-percent fee hike sparks protest

Tuition hikes won't impact students from families who earn less than $70,000 annually, officials say.

Tuition hikes won't impact students from families who earn less than $70,000 annually, officials say.

As protests raged outside, the University of California Board of Regents on Nov. 19 approved a 32-percent fee increase for students attending the state’s premier public universities in a dramatic example of how the recession has hit public education hard.

The vote in a windowless University of California, Los Angeles, meeting room took place as hundreds of students and union members gathered nearby, waving signs, pounding drums, and chanting “We’re fired up, can’t take it no more” and “Shame on you.” Their signs contained messages such as “No fee hikes” and “Wanted: Leadership.”

The $2,500 increase will push the cost of an undergraduate education to more than $10,000 a year by next fall, about triple the cost of a decade ago. The fees, the equivalent of tuition, do not include the cost of housing, board, and books.

Regents say they had to raise fees because the cash-strapped state government can’t meet the university’s funding needs.

The decision came as hundreds of students chanted and marched outside the meeting hall to protest the measure. Some students also took over another UCLA building and chained the doors shut.

Police in riot gear kept an eye on the protesters.

“Our hand has been forced,” UC President Mark Yudof told reporters after the vote. “When you don’t have any money, you don’t have any money.”

Armed police–some with beanbag-firing shotguns–lined up behind steel barricades, watching over the protesters.

Some staff and board members were trapped in the building for up to several hours after the meeting because of the disruption outside. A van carrying regents and staff was surrounded and delayed by protesters as it tried to leave campus.

Three hours after the meeting, Yudof was escorted out by police, with protesters in pursuit shouting “Shame.”

One student was arrested for obstructing an officer. She was cited and released, said UCLA spokesman Phil Hampton.

Board members said the 229,000-student system had been whipsawed by years of state budget cuts, leaving no option other than turning to students’ wallets. Yudof has said the 10-campus system needs a $913 million increase in state funding next year, in addition to higher student fees.

State Assembly Speaker Karen Bass, a Democrat who sits on the board, said she would push for higher taxes, possibly on higher-income residents, to finance education. The state could face $20 billion shortfalls during each of the next five years.

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, a Republican, blamed UC’s financial crisis on the Legislature’s failure to reform the way the state collects and spends taxpayer money. He said he was unhappy about the increases, but considered them necessary under the circumstances.

“This is the time to look at our budget system and tax system. The Legislature should be sitting there right now fixing it. In the meantime, students have to suffer,” Schwarzenegger said.

At the UCLA campus, the meeting room was closed to visitors for the second day after repeated outbursts by demonstrators.

David Valenzuela, who graduated three months ago from UCLA, said he was on campus supporting friends when police pepper-sprayed him. “I didn’t even get a warning. My face was on fire,” said Valenzuela, 23.

Board members said students from households with incomes below $70,000 would be shielded from the fees, and financial aid would help others defray the higher cost. But that did little to ease the mood on campus, where some students wondered if they could afford the jump or qualify for more borrowing.

Ayanna Moody, a second-year prelaw student, said she feared she might have to attend a community college next year.

“I worked so hard to be at one of the most prestigious universities. To have to go back, it’s very depressing,” she said. Administrators “already cut out a lot of our majors and programs. I’d rather they cut some of their salaries.”

UCLA graduate student Matthew Luckett agreed: “They should cut from the top,” he said, referring to administration salaries.

About 30 to 50 protesters staged a takeover of Campbell Hall, a building across campus that houses ethnic studies. They chained the doors shut and there were no immediate plans to remove them.

The protests began earlier in the week, after a Regents’ committee endorsed the fee plan on Nov. 18.

“When you have no choice, you have no choice,” Yudof said after the committee’s decision. “I’m sorry.”

On Nov. 18, 14 demonstrators were arrested at UCLA and demonstrations spread to other campuses.

Yudof told reporters on Nov. 18 that he couldn’t rule out raising student fees again if the state is unable to meet his request for more funding. “I can’t make any … promises,” he said.

For a second day, the proposal drew demonstrators to the UCLA campus. Some came from other UC campuses and stayed overnight in a tent city.

The Nov. 19 meeting was repeatedly interrupted by outbursts from students and union members, who accused the board of turning its back on the next generation.

“We are bailing out the banks, we are bailing out Wall Street. Where is the bailout for public education?” asked UCLA graduate student Sonja Diaz.

Laura Zavala, 20, a third-year UCLA student, said she probably will have to get a second job to afford the increase.

“My family can’t support me. I have to pay myself,” she said. “It’s not fair to students, when they are already pinched.”

University of California, Irvine, economics student Sarah Bana told the board,
“You are jeopardizing California’s future.”

Link:

University of California system

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Christmas is coming…

With Christmas in under 80 days, we will all soon be hearing the pantomime shouts of ‘oh no he isn’t’ and ‘oh yes he is’. Christmas decorations are already in the shops and supermarket shelves are almost bursting with chocolates and mince pies.

On top of Mothers making sure they have their daughters beautiful Bloch leotards wrapped and ready, alongside the gorgeous pair of ballet Pointe shoes they’ve bought as Christmas presents, which will undoubtedly come as a wonderful surprise to the cheap ballet tights and cheap leotards that are usually worn… there will be dance teachers running around making sure they have everything prepared for the festive dance shows to be watched by proud parents, fellow pupils and friends.

Buying last minute pink ballet tights and soft ballet shoes will be the furthest thing on their minds when some little ballerina is still struggling with her solo dance routine and is so upset that she is going to fall or trip in front of everyone and snag her brand new beautiful pink tights or catch her stunning fluorescent pink tutu on one of the stage props. For these reasons, ordering with Dance Direct couldn’t be easier, providing stress-free online shopping and ordering is just one of the reasons why our customers rely on us and just keep coming back again and again. Knowing that our products have a fast and efficient delivery service is just yet another reason to stay with Dance Direct for all Dancewear needs.

Our warehouse is stocked from floor to ceiling with dance sneakers, children’s ballet tights, jazz shoes and tap shoes, lots of dance leotards and brightly coloured children’s tutus in a variety of beautiful bright colours, which gives our customers the peace of mind that they will receive the remaining last minute dancewear needed in time for the opening night of the schools dance classes big performance. The warehouse team are being kept on their toes picking and packing all of our dancewear orders as quickly as possible to avoid any unnecessary disappointment.

So there wont be a dry eye in the house when parents stand up to clap and congratulate their little angels, beaming with pride and looking simply beautiful all lined up on stage with matching silver tap shoes and black leotards ready to take a bow. Dance Direct are proud to be the company who supply affordable, quality dancewear to dance students, dance teachers and parents of dancers alike.

 

Europe’s leading online retailer of dancewear – Dance Direct.For further information regarding our range of Jazz pants and dancewear, please visit our website at http://www.dancedirect.com

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