More than 1.6 million college graduates are about to emerge into a cutthroat job market, one where last year’s graduates are still scrambling to land entry-level positions, BusinessWeek reports. Class of 2010, meet the competition: the Class of 2009. “It’s discouraging right now,” says 24-year-old Matt Grant, who graduated 10 months ago from Ohio State University with a degree in civil engineering and three internships. He finally has a job–as a banquet waiter at a Clarion Inn near Akron. Grant has applied for more than 100 engineering positions around the country. “It’s getting closer to the Class of 2010 (graduating),” Grant says. “I’m starting to worry more.” So is the Obama Administration. The plight of the young and cubicle-less could hurt the Democrats in midterm elections. The youthful voters who helped propel the party to victory in 2006 and 2008 show signs of waning enthusiasm amid their economic travails. “It’s definitely tamped down the energy and the excitement and activism that the Obama campaign had sparked among that entry-level age group,” says Democratic strategist Joe Trippi, who advised Howard Dean’s 2004 Presidential campaign and is involved in several midterm races. “The problem is they have other things to worry about now…”

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Laura Ascione

Laura Ascione is the Managing Editor, Content Services at eSchool Media. She is a graduate of the University of Maryland's prestigious Philip Merrill College of Journalism. When she isn't wrangling her two children, Laura enjoys running, photography, home improvement, and rooting for the Terps. Find Laura on Twitter: @eSN_Laura http://twitter.com/eSN_Laura