“I think there’s always room for both. One of the things we hear from a lot of our school-based customers is they want the BookFlix library as well, because [students] like to go from the computer experience and maybe take the book home,” said Else-Mitchell.

“It’s amazing to watch these kids see these books on the screen and then run over to the shelf to find more,” said Brekhus.

Brekhus said the different features of the eBooks help get students interested, but it’s the content that keeps them coming back.

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“I think there’s an opportunity to bridge the gap here from print to digital, [with] audio and interactivity, and that’s kind of exciting,” he said. “I think kids in general want things that move and sound and interact, but at the end of the day a good story wins you over.”

The digital reading environments flip the traditional model of the library, because there is no asset management required; students have anytime, anywhere access to the material as desired. The services, which are available for purchasing on a subscription basis, also include tools to track each child’s reading growth. For example, students can monitor their own reading growth in myON, and educators can view and download reports.