Over the past 12 months, teachers responded that they have taught the following:

  • Risks tied to social networking sites (34 percent)
  • Using strong passwords (23 percent)
  • How to send an eMail (20 percent)
  • How to identify a secure website (18 percent)
  • Identity theft (17 percent)
  • The role of a more secure internet in U.S. economy (7 percent)
  • The role of a more secure internet in national security (6 percent)
  • Protecting a mobile device (6 percent)
  • Careers in cyber security (4 percent)

Many stakeholders struggle to determine who holds the responsibility for teaching students about online safety, and they wonder if the duty falls to schools, parents, or both.

Teachers said they believe parents should take the most ownership over education children about safe and responsible online behavior. Seventy-nine percent of teachers said parents should take the lead, and 18 percent said teachers and schools should play the largest role in students’ online safety education.

Sixty percent of administrators agreed that parents should be responsible for educating their children about online safety, while 34 percent said teachers and schools should take the lead.

Interestingly, 52 percent of IT coordinators said teachers and schools should have biggest role in educating students about online safety, and 45 percent said parents should assume that role.