2. For enrichment.

Smith also wanted to use her iPad for students identified as “gifted,” as well as to enrich her own life.

“There are several apps out there for the ‘smart kids.’ I found one for the iPhone, which I use on the iPad, called Miss Spell’s Class,” she said. “It gives students a series of challenging vocabulary words, and they need to decide if it’s spelled correctly or incorrectly. I’ve seen my gifted kids get so frustrated (it shows them that they’re not always No. 1), and consequently, so proud of themselves because they’ve finally conquered it. The success is made much sweeter when you have to work for it.”

She continued, “Apps like Penultimate keep track of notes that I take on students. In my RtI groups, I take pictures of the work kids have done and put it into a file with their name on it, and notes for future teaching. The 2Do app helps me organize groups that I’m working with during class, and what we’re doing that day. I assign due dates and stay on track. Then, I know if someone is absent because they’re shown as overdue. TeacherPal helps me make my seating chart without erasing every quarter. Teacher’s Assistant allows my students on behavior plans to mark their own progress as they meet (or don’t meet) their goals. They are responsible for it, and are eager to earn points during the day simply so that they can enter it on the iPad. Regardless of the motivation, I’ll take it, since I’ve seen an improvement in behavior, especially … of fifth-grade [students].”