Review: 5 eBook readers for less than $175

Price can often play a big part in selection with so many eReaders on the market.

When Amazon.com’s ground-breaking Kindle eBook reader came out in 2007, it cost $399. Now, some eReaders, including the most recent Kindle entry, can be had for just north of $100.

At the price of five or so hardcover books, it’s close to impulse-buy territory for many people. And if people give in to their desires, what do they get? An AP reviewer’s test of five e-readers priced from $114 to $164 finds that cheap, in most cases, means good value.

All five have black-and-white screens that are about half the size of a paperback book. They can connect wirelessly to the Internet for e-book downloads.

The AP reviewer didn’t look closely at battery life, because with one exception, they all claim more than a month of use. The company time machine was occupied.

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