The summer months provide some time to organize this information, so you can save valuable time during the school year.

Summer is here, and for the most part this tends to be a quiet time in the grant-seeking world, as many government grantors are not holding competitions. As a result, this might be a good time to work on items that naturally fall by the wayside from September to May, when grant deadlines are occurring on a steady basis.

Although seasoned grant writers know that it’s unwise to copy and paste entire proposals, there is some “boilerplate” information that you can keep on file and use for many proposals that you submit to both public and private funders. The summer months provide some time to organize this information, so you can save valuable time during the school year—rather than spending hours looking for background information to support your need as a grant deadline looms.

Here are some suggested items that you can work on to prepare for upcoming submissions:

1. Update the demographics of your district, including student enrollment, attendance per grade level, number of teachers, and so on. If you do not have this information written in narrative form already, spend some time developing a short paragraph that contains this information. Use the most current numbers that you can access.

2. If you do not have a brief description of your community, develop a short paragraph or two that includes information about population, ethnicity, unemployment, number of employers, poverty levels, crime statistics, and drug abuse information. Depending on the geographic location of your district, you also might want to identify nearby landmarks, cities, etc., so that readers have a sense of “where you are” as they review your proposal.