Educational resource conceptualizes how educators can improve and enhance attention and impulse control, time management, organization and more in students

BALTIMORE, MD – July 7, 2011 – Students with strong executive function skills hold the keys to school and social success—from attention and impulse control to time management and organization. Now K–12 teachers have a practical guide to enhancing these critical skills for all students, with and without learning disabilities with Executive Function in the Classroom. In it, Author Christopher Kaufman develops a structure for teachers to ensure student achievement.

Through classroom examples and crystal-clear explanations of brain functioning, the book will help teachers immediately grasp what executive function is and how it affects their students’ learning and behavior. The author provides research-based guidance that teachers need to improve executive function skills, implement a student-centric executive function coaching process, develop individual behavior support plans that address challenges, as well as chapters targeting specific academic subjects.

An unparalleled practical resource on one of today’s most critical education topics, this sourcebook equips teachers with the tools to detect and solve their students’ executive function challenges. They’ll get a wide range of ready-to-use strategies based on best practices, visual aids, and forms designed to improve student-specific executive function areas.

The educational guide identifies behavioral tendencies that raise red flags in the classroom. The author emphasizes these behaviors to illustrate how a constructive response from teachers can greatly influence students’ future success. The framework pinpoints student behavior such as:

• Easy distraction by internal and external stimuli
• Failure to complete work because of difficulty assigning priority to elements of schoolwork
• “Just sits there” when other students have started working
• Quickly fatiguing in academic contexts
• Ability to answer factual/explicit questions, but struggling with recalling more complex details
•Often becoming verbally and physically aggressive when angered

“Executive Function in the Classroom is a clear, effective resource for educators who seek to address classroom management in a more student-centric manner,” said Sharon Larkin, Marketing Manager at Brookes Publishing. “It allows them to create defined paths to lasting academic and social success for all learners in their classroom.”

About the Author
Christopher Kaufman, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist and Lead Psychologist for Portland (Maine) Public Schools. He also operates, with his wife Sara, a part-time business, Kaufman Psychological Services, through which he provides workshops for educators and clinicians on a range of brain-based learning topics. Dr. Kaufman was born in New York City; raised on Long Island, New York; and earned his doctoral degree in Educational Psychology (with a specialization in School Psychology) in 1993 from the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York. His clinical specialties include attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and related executive functioning disorders, learning disabilities, and pediatric anxiety disorders. He resides in Gorham, Maine, with his wife and two children.

About Brookes Publishing
For more than 30 years, Brookes Publishing has been a leading provider of professional resources and assessments in early childhood, literacy, and special education. Brookes Publishing is headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland. For more information, please visit www.brookespublishing.com.
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