Casio’s Short Throw lampless projectors allow a 60-inch image to be projected from less than three feet from the screen.

From lampless projectors, to control systems that automatically turn off electronic devices when they aren’t in use, to “network monitors” that bring the concept of network computing back to life, products designed to save energy and reduce operating costs were a key area of focus at InfoComm 2011 in Orlando.

Last year, Casio introduced its Green Slim Projector, an eco-friendly projector that uses a patented hybrid “solid state” light source—combining laser and LED technology to achieve high brightness—instead of a traditional mercury lamp.

Designed to last 20,000 hours, or about 18 school years, the Green Slim Projector aimed to save schools money by eliminating the need for expensive lamp replacements. A typical mercury lamp lasts roughly 2,000 hours and costs about $400 to replace—meaning schools could spend thousands of dollars in new lamps over the life of a projector.

The Green Slim Projector was only 1.7 inches thick, making it among the market’s most portable projectors. But its slim form factor also was somewhat limiting. At this year’s InfoComm, Casio launched two new series of lampless projectors—a Pro and a Short Throw series—that “remove the shackles of the slim form factor,” said a Casio representative.

Casio’s Short Throw lampless projectors allow a 60-inch image to be projected from less than three feet from the screen. They can display 3D content and include an optional pen and software for turning any surface into an interactive workspace, allowing users to annotate and save projected content.

The company’s Pro series of lampless projectors also are 3D-ready. They are networkable, put out 10 watts of sound, and offer up to 3,500 lumens of brightness, Casio said.

For schools that already own lamp-based projectors, Extron Electronics announced that its PoleVault and WallVault AV switching systems include an automatic shut-off feature that can save power and extend a projector’s lamp life.