Other companies, such as SMART Technologies, offer interactive tabletop surfaces that cost a few thousand dollars. Priced at $1,699 through Epson’s Brighter Futures program for schools, the combination of the Copernicus mount and Epson projector offers a more cost-effective way to create an interactive tabletop than these other products; schools that already own BrightLink 455Wi projectors can purchase the Copernicus table mount separately for $129 through Epson’s Brighter Futures program.

As part of its line of education products, which include durable laptops, monitors, large-format commercial displays, and reliable printers, Samsung also features a 65-inch touch-screen interactive whiteboard with an LCD display, the 650TS. Its advanced optical sensor technology enables touch-sensitivity all the way to the edges of the screen, Samsung says.

The 650TS features 1,920 by 1,080p full HD resolution, a high (510-nits) brightness level, and a 5,000-to-1 contrast ratio, so students can view images on the board even in brightly lit classrooms. Glare and eye fatigue are minimized by an anti-reflective coating over tempered glass, Samsung says—and with a wide viewing angle of up to 178 degrees, the 650TS ensures that students can see the board from any seat in the classroom.

PolyVision has announced new products designed to complement its eno interactive whiteboard. A new “digital visualizer,” called fuse, combines a high-resolution document camera, web camera, and scanner in a single, compact solution. Fuse’s patented TrueSnap technology can automatically rotate documents, eliminate the bend caused by book bindings, and provide instant high-contrast photocopies with one press of a button on the user-friendly control panel, PolyVision says. And PolyVision’s new eno play is an amplifier and sound system that can install inside the eno board, with no additional wires or speakers necessary to deliver rich audio throughout a classroom.

At recent ed-tech conferences, BenQ has displayed a four-by-12-foot interactive whiteboard system for large meeting rooms or media centers. The system consists of three interactive projectors from BenQ, as well as wall mounts, an interactive pen, and software to tie the images all together. For about $10,000, schools can turn a 4×12 surface into a giant interactive screen, the company says.

Although that might be too expensive for many schools, BenQ also sells 3D-ready projectors for as little as $299 for 2,500 lumens and SVGA resolution. BenQ’s ultra short-throw projectors use a flat mirror as opposed to a spherical one, the company says—for a crisper picture quality around the edges of the image.