Obama's 2013 education budget focuses on STEM initiatives and workforce readiness.

The U.S. Department of Education (ED) would receive nearly $70 billion under President Barack Obama’s FY2013 budget, which he presented to Congress on Feb. 13. The $69.8 billion budget request represents a 2.5 percent increase—up $1.7 billion—from the 2012 budget.

Notable funding areas include a $14 billion one-time investment in key reform areas: aligning education programs with workforce demands, supporting high-quality teachers, and increasing college quality and affordability.

Race to the Top, Obama’s signature school reform program, would receive $850 million under the budget proposal. A large portion of that sum would go to early learning, and the 2013 competition would, in part, focus on helping state and local districts support reforms and innovations to close achievement gaps and increase student achievement.

“In these tough budget times, the Obama administration is making a clear statement that high-quality education is absolutely critical to rebuilding our economy,” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. “If we want to strengthen the American workforce, we must continue to invest in education.”

For more analysis of Obama’s 2013 budget, see:

Obama seeks more money for education, setting up showdown with Congress

Title I would receive $14.5 billion, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act would receive $11.6 billion—the same as in 2012.

School Improvement Grants would receive $534 million, and the budget directs $150 million to the Investing in Innovation fund to develop, evaluate, and scale up evidence-based approaches to improve student achievement, raise graduation rates, and increase teacher and school leader effectiveness. Some of those funds would support the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Education (ARPA-ED), a new ed-tech agency that Obama first proposed last year with no success, in developing breakthrough learning technologies.