Here are some of the top educational technology stories in the June 2012 edition of eSchool News.

The FCC finally will tell phone companies to stop overcharging schools; Florida and Washington are moving forward with digital textbook initiatives, and Alabama could be next; and a new tool will help parents and educators identify the learning value of various digital media.

These are some of the top educational technology stories in the June 2012 edition of eSchool News, which is now available online.

To read these stories, click on the headlines below—or click here to browse the full digital publication.

FCC to telcos: Stop gouging schools

Fifteen years after creation of the eRate, the federal program that provides about $2.25 billion per year in telecommunications discounts to eligible schools and libraries, the Federal Communications Commission finally will begin enforcing a rule that requires companies to offer their best service rates to schools, ProPublica reports…

States inch toward digital textbooks

Despite enthusiasm for digital textbooks at the national level, states have been slow to get on board. But the movement is gaining strength…

Children’s digital media rated for learning value

A new learning ratings initiative will evaluate the learning potential of websites, video games, and mobile apps and will offer ratings and reviews to give parents, teachers, and students a guide to find resources to extend learning time, make learning fun, and build 21st-century skills…

States struggle to evaluate special-ed teachers

Spurred by the U.S. Department of Education’s $4.35 billion Race to the Top grant competition, more than a dozen states have passed laws to reform how teachers are evaluated and include student growth as a component. For most students, that growth will be measured on standardized tests. But for special-education students, that is considerably more complicated…

Why Khan Academy is so popular with students

Sal Khan, whose online Khan Academy serves up video tutorials to more than 6 million students worldwide each month, wants to reassure teachers that the free educational service isn’t out to take their jobs—nor is it a statement about a teacher’s ability to deliver a lesson effectively…

New platform could help power ‘flipped learning’

TED, a nonprofit organization devoted to spreading big ideas through a series of conferences and a free video platform, has continued its expansion into education by launching a brand-new TED-Ed website with tools to help teachers use video in the classroom…