Here’s a summary of what Obama and Romney have said about their plans for K-12 education.

When voters go to the polls on Nov. 6, they’ll choose from among presidential candidates who have very different views on the major issues affecting America, including education.

With the election rapidly approaching, we’ve pulled together a summary of what each of the two major party candidates—President Barack Obama for the Democratic Party, and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney for the Republican Party—have said about their plans for K-12 education.

(To read about their plans, click on the headlines for each article.)

What do you think about the election? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

Preparing every child for college or a career

In today’s global economy, a high-quality education is no longer just a pathway to opportunity—it is a prerequisite to success. Because economic progress and educational achievement are inextricably linked, educating every American student to graduate from high school prepared for college and for a career is a national imperative…

Countless reforms, but few results

By emphasizing choice, accountability, and teacher quality, instead of simply throwing more money at challenges that have long since proven themselves unresponsive to increased spending, we can build an education system worthy of our next generation.

 

See also:

How school stakeholders view the presidential election

Education policies, funding at stake in 2012 election

Obama: Ryan’s economic plan costly to schools

Obama renews call for aid to halt teacher layoffs

Expert: Federal school reform plan is wrong

Romney: American kids get ‘third-world’ education

Fact check: Romney off on Obama’s love for unions

Romney tells Philly teachers that class size doesn’t matter

Mitt Romney’s plan to federalize education reform